fri 17/08/2018

Classical Reviews

Martín, SCO, Ticciati, Usher Hall, Edinburgh review - farewell to the best of chief conductors

Miranda Heggie

The Scottish Chamber Orchestra’s final season concert conducted by Robin Ticciati, who leaves his post as chief conductor of the SCO for the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, was bound to be an emotional occasion. Spanning a decade, the relationship between orchestra and conductor has been a very special one indeed, and has seen an abundance of success over the past 10 years.

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Donohoe, LPO, Orozco-Estrada, RFH review – wit aplenty in rare Stravinsky

Bernard Hughes

I left this concert a bit depressed, but not because of anything I heard: rather, by the conservatism of London concert-goers. As London orchestras focus on programming the usual wall-to-wall Brahms, Beethoven and Mahler, the LPO was rewarded for their excursion from the well-trodden path by the punters staying away in droves from this imaginative programme.

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Faust, LSO, Gardiner, Barbican review - Schumann as never before

David Nice

When a great musician pulls out of a concerto appearance, you're usually lucky if a relative unknown creates a replacement sensation. In this case not one but two star pianists withdrew – Maria João Pires, scheduling early retirement, succeeded by an unwell Piotr Anderzewski – and instead we had that most musicianly and collaborative of violinists Isabelle Faust in Schumann, not the scheduled Mozart.

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Ruthless Jabiru, King's College London / Arditti Quartet, Wigmore Hall review - delicate, dedicated modernism

Gavin Dixon

Ruthless Jabiru is an all-Australian chamber orchestra based in London. It is the brainchild of conductor Kelly Lovelady, who in recent years has geared the ensemble towards political and environmental concerns. Previous projects have highlighted environmental damage in central Australia and the campaign to end sponsorship by oil companies in the arts sector.

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Hallenberg, LSO, Gardiner, Barbican review - palpitating Schumann and Berlioz

David Nice

Violins, violas, wind and brass all standing for Schumann: gimmick or gain?

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Sonoro, Ferris, St Botolph-without-Bishopsgate review - intriguingly programmed launch concert

Bernard Hughes

Launched into an already crowded choral scene in 2016, the professional choir Sonoro has marked its second birthday with the release of a debut CD. Last night was the launch concert, featuring items selected from the disc. On the evidence of both CD and concert Sonoro is a very welcome new addition to the roster of excellent London choirs, with its own distinct sound and ethos.

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Goode, BBC Philharmonic, Gernon, Bridgewater Hall, Manchester review – making beautiful music

Robert Beale

Just over a year since his Bridgewater Hall début, Ben Gernon appeared with the BBC Philharmonic there again – this time well into his role as their Principal Guest Conductor, yet his first concert with them there since officially taking up the position.

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Brantelid, LPO, Petrenko, RFH review - orchestral excesses redeemed by graceful Elgar

Gavin Dixon

The London Philharmonic, conductor Vasily Petrenko and cellist Andreas Brantelid are just back from a tour of China, so they’ve had plenty of time to get to know each other. That affinity is apparent in the ease with which Petrenko (pictured below by Chris Christodoulou) marshals the orchestral forces, directly transmitting his trademark energy to every section.

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Explore Ensemble, EXAUDI, St John's Smith Square review - making sense of Nono

Helen Wallace

This was an evening of silence and shadow, a chill, moonlit meditation, where each sound demanded forensic attention. Enter the world of Luigi Nono and his admirers.

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Kaufmann, Damrau, Deutsch, Barbican review - bliss, if only you closed your eyes

alexandra Coghlan

Schubert’s winter wanderer had Wilhelm Muller to voice his despair, while Schumann’s poet-in-love had Heinrich Heine. The lovers of Hugo Wolf’s Italienisches Liederbuch must make do with only the words of anonymous Italian authors, albeit dressed up for the salon in elegant German translations by Paul Heyse.

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