mon 27/05/2019

Classical Reviews

Thibaudet/Batiashvili/Capuçon Trio, Barbican review – a supergroup to savour

Boyd Tonkin

Even in a large hall, very good things can come in small packages. In advance, partisans of the Wigmore Hall or some other dedicated chamber space might have feared that the Barbican’s main auditorium would turn out to be too chilly a barn for the intimate music-making promised by this supergroup. All-star trios or quartets, made up of soloists more accustomed to the undivided limelight, can frequently add up to less than the sum of their parts.

Read more...

LSO, Roth, Barbican - not enough pathos, but a remarkable step-in

Sebastian Scotney

Missa in Angustiis. Mass in troubled times. There was a logic in programming Haydn’s D minor Mass on the Armistice Centenary day. The final words of the mass, dona nobis pacem, would be the right ones to end this day of reflection.

Read more...

Borodin Quartet, LPO, Jurowski, RFH review - mixed results in oddball Czechfest

David Nice

How many times have you heard live in concert a concerto for string quartet and instrumental ensemble? In my case, three, all of the occasions performances of John Adams's Beethoven-based giant scherzo Absolute Jest.

Read more...

Fialkowska, BBCSO, Nesterowicz, Barbican review – a cliche-free night in Poland

Boyd Tonkin

National feeling – in music, as anywhere else – depends on choice, not blood. This BBC Symphony Orchestra concert at the Barbican to mark the centenary of Poland’s rebirth as a nation never felt remotely like a feast of aural jingoism.

Read more...

Federico Colli, Wigmore Hall review – poised on the edge of the possible

Jessica Duchen

The Italian pianist Federico Colli, 30, best known so far as winner of the 2012 Leeds International Piano Competition, last night arrived for his Wigmore Hall debut sporting an emerald-green cravat, but the sonic colours he magicked out of the piano quickly put its gleam in the shade.

Read more...

Dmitri Ensemble, Ross, St John's Smith Square review - impressive minimalism for strings

Bernard Hughes

The latest instalment of the Americana ’18 series at St John’s Smith Square last Friday saw the Dmitri Ensemble and conductor Graham Ross present a survey of American minimalist music for string ensemble. In a brilliantly conceived programme, the ensemble found fresh energy and propulsion in these classic works, but also a subtlety and humanity in a style that can be mechanistic.

Read more...

Hallé, Elder, Bridgewater Hall, Manchester review – pictorial, dramatic power

Robert Beale

Sir Mark Elder’s first concert in the Hallé Thursday series for 2018-19 was on clearly mapped Hallé territory – Richard Strauss and Elgar. They have a reputation, and a tradition, of playing these composers’ music very well.

Read more...

Car, Australian Chamber Orchestra, Tognetti, Milton Court review - a rattlebag of happy collaborations

David Nice

Presenting the last Mozart symphonies as a three-act opera for orchestra, as Richard Tognetti and his febrile fellow Australians did on Monday, was always going to be a supreme challenge. It worked, as Boyd Tonkin reported here.

Read more...

Verdi's Requiem, Royal Opera, Pappano review - all that heaven allows

David Nice

Here it comes - get a grip. The tears have started flowing in the trio "Quid sum miser" and 12 minutes later, as the tenor embarks on his "Ingemisco" solo, you have to stop the shakes turning into noisy sobbing. The composer then lets you off the hook for a bit, but only transcendent beauty in singing and playing can achieve quite this effect in Verdi's Requiem.

Read more...

Australian Chamber Orchestra, Tognetti, Milton Court review - brilliantly hyper-active Mozart

Boyd Tonkin

Think Glastonbury, not Salzburg. It struck me at Milton Court last night that the Australian Chamber Orchestra’s ebullient, rock’n’roll Mozart would go down a storm at the sort of music festival renowned for canvas more than canapes.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Our Town, Regent's Park Open Air Theatre review – small...

Our Town was written shortly before World War Two about a small town in America in...

The Strokes, All Points East Festival review - let them ente...

Back in 2001, after the release of their debut album This Is It, The Strokes weren’t just the most fashionable band in the world, they...

Haley Fohr: Salomé, Brighton Festival 2019 review – potently...

Haley Fohr’s disquiet at the “wildly outmoded” sexual politics of this notorious 1923 Wilde adaptation led her to...

CD: Richard Hawley - Further

Richard Hawley’s eighth solo album, Further is, like so many of his previous discs, a masterclass in good taste and relaxed easy...

Hiromi Kawakami: The Ten Loves of Mr Nishino review - Don Ju...

My first, beguiling taste of Hiromi Kawakami’s fiction came when, in 2014, I and my fellow-judges shortlisted Strange Weather in Tokyo...

Reissue CDs Weekly: Bernard Herrmann

Debates about whether 1964’s Marnie presaged Alfred...

CD: Youssou N'Dour - History

Yousou N’Dour has come a long way from his cassettes with Super Etoile de Dakar, that wild mbalax energy, fed by the clatter of the high-...

Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds, Cardiff Castle revi...

Blessed with a red sunset and an adoring crowd, Noel Gallagher brought life to the ruins of...

Spice Girls, Croke Park, Dublin review - uncomplicated fun

They’re back and they’re looking and sounding good – and Spice Girls mania took over Dublin’s city centre for several hours before...