tue 13/04/2021

Visual Arts reviews, news & interviews

This is a Robbery: The World's Biggest Art Heist, Netflix - the last word (for now)

Florence Hallett

It’s no surprise that 30 years on, the individuals most closely connected to the world’s biggest art heist are showing their age.

Prix Pictet: Confinement review - a year in photographs

Florence Hallett

Sustainability and the environment are watchwords for the Prix Pictet, the international photography prize now in its ninth cycle.

Pioneering Women, Oxford Ceramics Gallery online...

Marina Vaizey

Pioneering is an attractive adjective in this context, alerting the spectator to what has been, over the past half century, an extraordinary body of...

Best of 2020: Visual Arts

Theartsdesk

Unhappy as it is to be ending the year with museums and galleries closed, 2020 has had its triumphs, and there is plenty to look forward to in 2021....

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Tate Britain review -...

Sarah Kent

A person in a brown polo neck turns away, looking down (pictured below right). The encounter feels really intimate; we are almost breathing down this...

Tracey Emin / Edvard Munch, Royal Academy review - juxtapositions that confuse rather than clarify

Sarah Kent

Similar themes, different sensibilities

Zanele Muholi, Tate Modern review - photography as protest

Sarah Kent

Pictures so confrontational they knock you sideways

Michael Clark: Cosmic Dancer, Barbican Art Gallery review - mould-breaker, ground-shaker

Jenny Gilbert

A crash course in the life and times of an iconoclast and muse

Sin, National Gallery review - great subject, modest show

Sarah Kent

A small gathering can't do justice to this fabulous topic

Bruce Nauman, Tate Modern review - the human condition writ large in neon

Sarah Kent

How to make great art out of almost nothing

Artemisia, National Gallery review - worth the wait

Florence Hallett

A glorious celebration of one of the great baroque painters

Hold Still, National Portrait Gallery review - snapshots from lockdown

Marina Vaizey

An online exhibition offers a glimpse of life in Britain now

My Rembrandt review - hard cash and hubris

Florence Hallett

Characters historical and contemporary mingle in an entertaining portrait of the art world

George IV: Art & Spectacle, The Queen's Gallery review - all is aglitter

Marina Vaizey

A sumptuous display from the Royal Collection heralds a top class reopening

Khadija Saye: In This Space We Breathe, 236 Westbourne Grove review - a celebrated series finds new resonance

Florence Hallett

The artist's most celebrated works launch a new public art project in west London

The Golden Age of Modern Spanish Art, Colnaghi review - the sun shines in the City of Light

Florence Hallett

A celebration of little known Spanish painters as the London art world emerges again

Visual Arts Lockdown Special 4: half-way houses

Katherine Waters

Some galleries prepare to reopen, others remain closed; online still offers riches

Celia Paul: My Studio, Victoria Miro review - sublime isolation

Florence Hallett

One of the great painters of our time responds to life in lockdown

Shirley Baker: A Different Age, James Hyman Gallery review - the old at leisure

Florence Hallett

A little-known photographer and an overlooked subject take the spotlight

Explore Soane review - the museum restored and in 3D

Florence Hallett

Two favourite rooms remain accessible via a digital twin

Christo (1935-2020) - 'Beauty, science and art will always triumph'

Florence Hallett

One of the great visionaries of our era, Christo believed absolutely in art for art's sake

Dalí Theatre-Museum, Figueres, virtual tour review - tantalising but unsatisfactory

Florence Hallett

The magic of Dalí's private world is lost in its virtual form

Visual Arts Lockdown Special 3: gigapixel Rembrandt, magic mushrooms, and more

Florence Hallett

The best art online this week

Unto the Last: Two Hundred Years of John Ruskin, Watts Gallery–Artists' Village, review - a breath of fresh air

Florence Hallett

The former home of Victorian artists GF and Mary Watts is a restorative treat, even online

XXI presented by ARTCELS, HOFA Gallery review - art as investment

Florence Hallett

Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, Banksy and more come together in a depressing investment portfolio

Visual Arts Lockdown Special 2: read, search, listen, create

Katherine Waters

Our pick of visual arts during lockdown

Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse, Royal Academy, Exhibition on Screen/Facebook Premiere - a hardy perennial returns

Florence Hallett

Monet's garden at Giverny provides an escape back to a hit exhibition from 2016

Van Eyck: An Optical Revolution, Museum of Fine Arts, Ghent online review - capturing the unrepeatable

Florence Hallett

A short but evocative guided tour of this exceptional exhibition goes online

Visual Arts Lockdown Special 1: DIY art, Russell Tovey's chat show, and guided tours online

Florence Hallett

Our pick of the visual arts during lockdown

Footnote: A brief history of british art

The National Gallery, the British Museum, Tate Modern, the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Royal Collection - Britain's art galleries and museums are world-renowned, not only for the finest of British visual arts but core collections of antiquities and artworks from great world civilisations.

Holbein_Ambasssadors_1533The glory of British medieval art lay first in her magnificent cathedrals and manuscripts, but kings, aristocrats, scientists and explorers became the vital forces in British art, commissioning Holbein or Gainsborough portraits, founding museums of science or photography, or building palatial country mansions where architecture, craft and art united in a luxuriously cultured way of life (pictured, Holbein's The Ambassadors, 1533 © National Gallery). A rich physician Sir Hans Sloane launched the British Museum with his collection in 1753, and private collections were the basis in the 19th century for the National Gallery, the V&A, the National Portrait Gallery, the original Tate gallery and the Wallace Collections.

British art tendencies have long passionately divided between romantic abstraction and a deep-rooted love of narrative and reality. While 19th-century movements such as the Pre-Raphaelite painters and Victorian Gothic architects paid homage to decorative medieval traditions, individualists such as George Stubbs, William Hogarth, John Constable, J M W Turner and William Blake were radicals in their time.

In the 20th century sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, painters Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, architects Zaha Hadid and Richard Rogers embody the contrasts between fantasy and observation. More recently another key patron, Charles Saatchi, championed the sensational Britart conceptual art explosion, typified by Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin. The Arts Desk reviews all the major exhibitions of art and photography as well as interviewing leading creative figures in depth about their careers and working practices. Our writers include Fisun Guner, Judith Flanders, Sarah Kent, Mark Hudson, Sue Steward and Josh Spero.

Close Footnote

Advertising feature

Download British Museum gallery introductions to your device

 

From Egyptian mummies and ancient Greek sculpture to African art and Chinese porcelain, you can now download more than 60 gallery introductions directly to your phone, tablet or other device.

These short audio tracks (2–3 minutes), narrated by British Museum curators, can help you prepare for your visit, or can also be enjoyed at home.

Download now and skip the queue for our sell-out audio guides when you visit the Museum.

Available in English, Korean, Chinese, Spanish and Italian.

download from iTunes
download from Google Play

Sponsored by Korean Air


newsletter

Get a weekly digest of our critical highlights in your inbox each Thursday!

Simply enter your email address in the box below

View previous newsletters

latest in today

Polly Barton: Fifty Sounds review - what is lost in translat...

Fifty Sounds is translator Polly Barton’s first novel, conceived as part of Fitzcarraldo’s annual essay prize. The book begins with...

Album: Imelda May - 11 Past the Hour

11 Past the Hour opens with its title song, a delicious, twangy, string-laden Nancy Sinatra Bond theme that never was. The album closes...

Singer-songwriter Peggy Seeger: still in the vanguard of her...

If American music has a royal family, it’s surely the Seeger clan. Charles, the patriarch, the composer, musicologist and teacher who could be...

Album: Lady Dan - I Am the Prophet

There’s a line in “No Home”, the staggering centrepiece of Lady Dan’s debut album, that perhaps sums up the project. “Wolves will never...

Reissue CDs Weekly: Wes Montgomery - The NDR Hamburg Studio...

Speaking to America’s Hit Parader magazine in August 1967...

Night in Paradise review - lukewarm bloodbath

Since launching his directing career in 2011 with The Showdown, Park Hoon-jung has established himself as a promising devotee of the...

DVD/Blu-ray: Catch Us If You Can

Catch Us If You Can, the 1965 road movie starring Barbara Ferris and the eponymous drummer and guiding force of the Dave Clark Five,...

The Seven Deadly Sins / Mahagonny Songspiel, Royal Opera onl...

There are so many good ideas, so much talented hard work from the singers of the Jette Parker Young Artists Programme and two dancers, such a...