thu 06/10/2022

Reviews

The Boy with Two Hearts, National Theatre review - poignant yet humorous story of family forced to flee Afghanistan

Rachel Halliburton

It’s particularly poignant to watch this story in the knowledge that a little over a year after US-led troops withdrew from Afghanistan, women and girls are enduring a renewed repression of their rights under the Taliban. The real-life story of The Boy with Two Hearts took place in 2000 – the year before the western invasion began; to see it today is a depressing reminder of how little was achieved through that ill-thought-out venture.

James IV: Queen of the Fight, Festival Theatre, Edinburgh review - revelatory historical drama

David Kettle

"The poem is real," intones entertainer-turned-courtier Ellen solemnly as a prologue and epilogue to Rona Munro’s vivid, vibrant new James IV: Queen of the Fight, presented by Scottish producers Raw Material and Edinburgh’s Capital Theatres in association with the National Theatre of Scotland, and getting its premiere at the city’s Festival Theatre before a Scotland-wide tour.

Inside Man, BBC One review - strong cast trapped...

Adam Sweeting

Screenwriter and showrunner Steven Moffat is renowned for some of his work, especially Sherlock, but other stuff not so much (I direct you towards...

Lucian Freud: New Perspectives, National Gallery...

Sarah Kent

There stands Lucian Freud in Reflection with Two Children (Self-portrait), 1965 (main picture) towering over you, peering mercilessly down. Is that a...

Jaminaround, Ancient Technology Centre, Cranborne...

Mark Kidel

The most unlikely venue: an extraordinary, authentic-as-can-be replica of a large Iron Age roundhouse. There’s a turf and grass roof, and the...

Andrew Murray: Is Socialism Possible in Britain? review - what went wrong and why Corbynism failed

Hugh Barnes

An inside take on the most radical period in Labour's history

Iphigenia in Splott, Lyric Hammersmith review - raises as many questions as answers

Gary Naylor

Timely revival of Gary Owen's solo play

Music Reissues Weekly: Catch-A-Fire - Treasure Isle Ska, Top Ranking DJ Session

Kieron Tyler

Unearthed - Jamaica’s impact on the music of punk and post-punk Britain

Tosca, English National Opera review - a tale of two eras

David Nice

Powerful singing and playing, but mixed historical periods mute the drama

The Crucible, National Theatre review - visually stunning revival of Miller's classic drama

Mert Dilek

Lyndsey Turner paints this seminal drama with disturbing colours

Mrs Harris Goes to Paris review - Lesley Manville as a Fifties charlady with a heart of gold

Markie Robson-Scott

Director Anthony Fabian embraces escapism in his adaptation of Paul Gallico's novel

Remote review - an irredeemably silly first feature

Sarah Kent

An ill-conceived 'art' movie about overcoming loneliness

Blonde review - Marilyn Monroe thrown to the wolves

Graham Fuller

Cruel biopic revels in the star's victimhood

John Gabriel Borkman, Bridge Theatre review - amusing tale of awful people

Demetrios Matheou

Simon Russell Beale is the unapologetically corrupt banker, in Ibsen's chilly tragicomedy

Savala Nolan: Don't Let It Get You Down review - finding voice in the liminal

Hannah Hutchings-Georgiou

Essays on the spaces between black and white, rich and poor, thin and fat

Jews. In Their Own Words, Royal Court review - calling out ancient prejudice

Aleks Sierz

After its antisemitic blunder a year ago, this venue makes amends

Yiyun Li: The Book of Goose - fame, reality and two teenage French girls

Markie Robson-Scott

Yiyun Li's compelling fifth novel marks a new departure

This England, Sky Atlantic review - how Boris's No 10 got Covid wrong

Helen Hawkins

Kenneth Branagh gets Boris (mostly) right, but what does this docudrama hope to achieve?

Kim Noble, Soho Theatre review - final part of trilogy about loneliness

Veronica Lee

You'll need a strong stomach for the comedy-performance art overlap of 'Lullaby for Scavengers'

In Front of Your Face review - a day in the life

Nick Hasted

An ex-actress's return to Seoul is beatific and drunkenly raw, in Hong Sangsoo's latest

Purcell's Playhouse, Bevan, Barokksolistene, Eike, Purcell Room review - kaleidoscopic delights

David Nice

Vivacious British soprano shares the communicative spirit of her Norwegian colleagues

Hallyu! The Korean Wave, V&A review - frenetic but fun

Sarah Kent

Learn how to succeed, South Korean style, right across the cultural board

Bronwyn Adcock: Currowan review - a fire foretold, a warning delivered

Harriet Mercer

Stories of surviving Australia’s worst bushfire

Eureka Day, Old Vic review - fun if not entirely fulfilling

Matt Wolf

Dissent in the ranks in uber-timely American comedy

Igor Levit, Wigmore Hall review - titanic talent shows his lighter side

Rachel Halliburton

Dazzling range in mastery of tone and technique

Marina Abramović: Gates and Portals, Modern Art Oxford and Pitt Rivers Museum review - transcendence lite

Sarah Kent

The grandmother of performance art induces deep breathing and a slow heartbeat

Aida, Royal Opera review - dour but disciplined

David Nice

Uniformly good cast, idiomatic conducting, production rigidly consistent in khaki

The Big Moon, Oran Mor, Glasgow review - partying prevails despite band's bad luck

Jonathan Geddes

The quartet's pop and indie blend was in fine fettle

Gurrelieder, LPO, Gardner, RFH review - everything in place, but still something’s missing

David Nice

Schoenberg's epic of love, death, afterlife and earthly regeneration sold a bit short

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latest in today

The Boy with Two Hearts, National Theatre review - poignant...

It’s particularly poignant to watch this story in the knowledge that a little over a year after US-led troops withdrew from Afghanistan, women and...

James IV: Queen of the Fight, Festival Theatre, Edinburgh re...

"The poem is real," intones entertainer-turned-courtier Ellen solemnly as a prologue and epilogue to Rona Munro’s...

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Inside Man, BBC One review - strong cast trapped on a sinkin...

Screenwriter and showrunner Steven Moffat is renowned for some of his work, especially...

Lucian Freud: New Perspectives, National Gallery review - a...

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