mon 01/06/2020

Classical Reviews

Mahler's 'Resurrection' Symphony, Philharmonia, Hrůša, RFH review - big picture, stunning details

David Nice

So many performances of Mahler's most theatrical symphony every season, so few conductors who have something radically fresh to say about it.

Read more...

Frang, CBSO, Yamada, Symphony Hall Birmingham review - the tingle factor

Richard Bratby

There’s a particular moment of a particular recording – I suppose every slightly over-obsessive record collector has one – that I just keep listening to over and over again. It’s in Fritz Reiner’s 1960 Chicago Symphony recording of Respighi’s The Fountains of Rome, and it comes right after the first flood of the Triton Fountain starts to recede.

Read more...

Michael Collins, Michael McHale, London Winds, Wigmore Hall review - flying the flag for wind chamber music

Bernard Hughes

In a week when my colleague Jessica Duchen was delighted by the Kaleidoscope Chamber Collective, last night’s concert, also at Wigmore Hall, by Michael Collins and London Winds showed that chamber music with winds need not be the poor relation of that with strings.

Read more...

Kaleidoscope Chamber Collective, Wigmore Hall review - a joyous celebration

Jessica Duchen

Nobody could deny that this was a weekend when we needed cheering up. The place for that was the Wigmore Hall, which played host to a recently formed “shape-shifting” ensemble of superb young soloists. The Kaleidoscope Chamber Collective was launched in 2017 by the violinist Elena Urioste and pianist Tom Poster (incidentally, they got married last summer).

Read more...

Elysian Singers, SPCMH, Sam Laughton, St Luke’s, Chelsea review - John Cage and friends given a rare airing

Bernard Hughes

In my reviewing for theartsdesk I like as much as possible to ski off-piste, reaching areas of repertoire, performer and venue that mainstream coverage doesn't. There is much great music-making that flies, to mix my metaphors, under the radar, but which is well worthy of being written about.

Read more...

Acis and Galatea, The Sixteen, Christophers, Cadogan Hall review – pocket-sized pastoral pleasures

Boyd Tonkin

Nymphs and shepherds – go away? In music, as in art or literature, the pastoral fripperies of the Baroque age can feel utterly alien to modern tastes. Those dalliances, seductions and abductions in the Arcadian landscapes of myth may cease to entice in an era that takes sexual violence seriously, while we scorn play-acting toffs who ape the lifestyle of some idealised peasantry, Marie Antoinette-style.

Read more...

Lise Davidsen, James Baillieu, Barbican review - opulence and the promise of greatness

David Nice

So much pressure is on for Lise Davidsen to be the next Kirsten Flagstad or Birgit Nilsson, but the question has to be asked: is this just The Voice - a big "just" when a dramatic Wagnerian soprano is at stake - or The Complete Artist?

Read more...

Angelich, Aurora Orchestra, Collon, Kings Place review - warm embraces from good companions

David Nice

"New Dawns" as a title smacked a bit of trying to shoehorn a fairly straightforward Aurora programme in to Kings Place's Nature Unwrapped series. Only Dobrinka Tabakova's short and sweet Dawn made the link, and that was old, not new (composed in 2007).

Read more...

Blaauw, LPO, Jurowski, RFH review - Beethoven seen in '2020 Vision'

Gavin Dixon

It’s Beethoven with everything for 2020, the composer’s 250th anniversary year. But the London Philharmonic has devised an interesting approach for their Beethoven-themed programming.

Read more...

Beatrice Rana, Wigmore Hall review - fantasy and sonority writ large

David Nice

Not even the unengaged or terminally weary could have dozed through this. Pianists have often commented how the Wigmore Steinway is too big for the hall, and most adjust accordingly.

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

First Person: Gabriel Prokofiev on 14 years of his Concerto...

For most people a turntable, or record player is used to play back old vinyls bought from a market or second hand store, or perhaps a carefully...

Philharmonia, Channel 4 review - death on the podium

Great idea to use a symphony orchestra as the basis for a TV drama, because all of human life is there. Not to mention death, since this...

Album: Sonic Boom - All Things Being Equal

Experiencing All Things Being Equal is akin to taking a trip through The Time Tunnel. Although the songs and the recordings on...

Matthew Kneale: Pilgrims review – adventures on the road to...

Some things really never change. After a blatant cheat perpetrated by a well-connected lout, one of the humblest pilgrims in Matthew Kneale’s band...

Moyra Davey: Index Cards review – fragments of the artist

Moyra Davey’s biographical note, included in Fitzcarraldo Editions’ copy of Index Cards, describes “a...

Reissue CDs Weekly: Edikanfo - The Pace Setters

Ghana was visited by two British musicians in the early Eighties. One was Mick Fleetwood, who recorded the Visitor album in Accra during...

Keiichiro Hirano: A Man review - the best kind of thriller

Keiichiro Hirano’s A Man has all the trappings of a ...

Blu-ray/DVD: Little Women

For the average female millennial, Greta Gerwig’s Little Women is the perfect film to watch in lockdown. Brought up on Winona Ryder’...

The Vast of Night review - perfectly paranoid

The Vast of Night’s premise scarcely guarantees originality. Non-...