fri 17/08/2018

Theatre Reviews

The Two Noble Kinsmen, Shakespeare's Globe review - a breezy bromance served up slight

Matt Wolf

Those who find the Bard tough going – wasn't that one of Emma Rice's admissions back in the day? – should beat a path to The Two Noble Kinsmen, a late-career collaboration with John Fletcher that emerges as Shakespeare lite.

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Fatherland, Lyric Hammersmith review - loud and proud, shame about the content

aleks Sierz

Masculinity, whether toxic or in crisis (but never ever problem-free), is a hardy perennial subject for British new writing, and this new piece from playwright Simon Stephens, Frantic Assembly director Scott Graham and Underworld musician Karl Hyde is a verbatim drama made up of...

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Translations, National Theatre review - an Irish classic returns with cascading force

Matt Wolf

What sort of physical upgrade can a play withstand? That question will have occurred to devotees of Brian Friel's Translations, a play that has thrived in smaller venues (London's Hampstead and Donmar, over time) and had trouble in larger spaces: a 1995 Broadway revival, starring Brian Dennehy, did a quick fade.

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Tartuffe, Theatre Royal Haymarket review - dual-language production loses its way

Jenny Gilbert

The idea of producing a classic play in a mix of two languages is pretty odd. What kind of audience is a bilingual version of Molière’s best-known comedy aiming at, you wonder. Homesick émigrés? British francophiles with rusty A-level French? Neither constituency is likely to be satisfied by this curious dish that is neither fish nor fowl.

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Consent, Harold Pinter Theatre review - exhilarating

David Benedict

Question: is Consent, transferred from the National to the West End, a sharp-tongued comedy or an acute reinvention of a revenge drama?

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Break of Noon, Finborough Theatre review - irredeemable?

Katherine Waters

I’ve forgotten my wallet.

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Peter Pan, Regent's Park Open Air Theatre review - ensemble playing at its best

Heather Neill

This exuberant production both clarifies and further complicates the conundrum of Peter Pan. In any production true to Barrie there is an underpinning of sadness, an acknowledgement of the losses we must all suffer: children leave home and adult responsibility takes the place of childhood innocence.

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The Grönholm Method, Menier Chocolate Factory - sleek and short but in no way deep

Matt Wolf

Add Catalan writer Jordi Galcerán to the shortlist of European playwrights who are finding an international perch, in this case with a tricksy four-character play that has had more than 200 productions in over 60 countries.

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The String Quartet’s Guide to Sex and Anxiety, Brighton Festival review - molto nervoso

Tom Birchenough

Calixto Bieito has a reputation as a radical theatre-maker, and by any standards The String Quartet’s Guide to Sex and Anxiety is an unusual, genre-breaking piece; Bieito has described it as “like a symphonic poem for a quartet of musicians, and a quartet of voices”.

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As You Like It / Hamlet, Shakespeare’s Globe review - ensemble emphasis sets a leaner style

Tom Birchenough

There’s a distinct feeling of back to basics to this opening double bill at the Globe under the theatre’s new Artistic Director Michelle Terry. The elaborations (some would say gimmickry) of Emma Rice’s short tenure have been reined back, and a new concentration prevails.

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