mon 18/11/2019

Theatre Reviews

Stray Dogs, Park Theatre review – no fire in this historic encounter

Rachel Halliburton

How do you begin to dramatise one of the most extraordinary conversations of the 20th century between two of its most charismatic and complex intellectuals?

Read more...

Touching the Void, Duke of York's Theatre review - not quite high enough

aleks Sierz

Theatre can touch thousands of lives. But can it compete with the success of a bestselling book? First published in 1988, mountaineer Joe Simpson's Touching the Void has apparently sold more than a million copies, and it's been translated into some 20 languages. It tells the adventure story of how he, and Simon Yates, climbed the Siula Grande peak in the Peruvian Andes in 1985.

Read more...

Mary Poppins, Prince Edward Theatre review - a lavish but old-fashioned revival

Marianka Swain

It’s been 15 years since Cameron Mackintosh’s stage musical version of P. L. Travers’ Mary Poppins made its West End debut.

Read more...

The Taming of the Shrew, Barbican review - different but still problematic

Heather Neill

This is one play by Shakespeare ripe for tinkering. It's well nigh impossible now to take it at face value and still find romance and fun in the bullying: the physical and psychological abuse as a supposedly problematic wife is "tamed" into submission. And there have been experiments.

Read more...

Shadows, Coronet Theatre review - talking heads in the void

David Nice

In a flowering branch of London theatre, Norway comes to Notting Hill with what's becoming revelatory regularity, thanks to the cultural support of that admirable country. Two visionary-searing Ibsen productions are now joined by an off-piste piece of performance art from the techno-innovative Oslo-based company De Utvalgte.

Read more...

The Antipodes, National Theatre review - mysterious and gently momentous

Matt Wolf

The National Theatre is forging its own special relationship with American playwright Annie Baker, having now produced three of her plays within four years, all in their smallest Dorfman space. The result has allowed a gathering acquaintance with a genuinely sta...

Read more...

Sydney & the Old Girl, Park Theatre review - black comedy too melodramatic

aleks Sierz

Actor Miriam Margolyes is a phenomenon. Not only has this Dickensian starred in high-profile shows both here and in Australia, a country whose citizenship she took up in 2013, but she is also Professor Sprout in the Harry Potter films. And a familiar face from television. And a voice on radio. The programme lists her 12 major awards.

Read more...

Death of a Salesman, Piccadilly Theatre review - galvanising reinvention of Arthur Miller's classic

Rachel Halliburton

It is 70 years since Willy Loman first paced a Broadway stage; 70 years since audiences were sucked into the vortex of a man trying to live America’s capitalist dream only to see his life crash and burn around him.

Read more...

God's Dice, Soho Theatre review - overlong and overblown

Veronica Lee

David Baddiel is a very fine comic, and over the past few years has become an acclaimed author of children's books. So I'm genuinely sad to say that his debut play at Soho Theatre really isn't very good.

Read more...

A Prayer for Wings, King's Head Theatre review - claustrophobic mother-daughter drama soars

David Nice

When Sean Mathias wrote A Prayer for Wings 35 years ago, the subject of young carers devoting their lives to parents with disabilities had just come as a revelation.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

Advertising feature

★★★★★

A compulsive, involving, emotionally stirring evening – theatre’s answer to a page-turner.
The Observer, Kate Kellaway

 

Direct from a sold-out season at Kiln Theatre the five star, hit play, The Son, is now playing at the Duke of York’s Theatre for a strictly limited season.

 

★★★★★

This final part of Florian Zeller’s trilogy is the most powerful of all.
The Times, Ann Treneman

 

Written by the internationally acclaimed Florian Zeller (The Father, The Mother), lauded by The Guardian as ‘the most exciting playwright of our time’, The Son is directed by the award-winning Michael Longhurst.

 

Book by 30 September and get tickets from £15*
with no booking fee.


latest in today

Herbie Hancock, Barbican EFG London Jazz Festival review – t...

When it comes to the true jazz legends capable of filling concert...

The Crown, Series 3, Netflix review - if you want binge TV,...

Although it conforms to a realistic chronology of events, this third season of Peter Morgan’s remarkable voyage around the House of...

Stray Dogs, Park Theatre review – no fire in this historic e...

How do you begin to dramatise one of the most extraordinary conversations of the 20th century between two of its most charismatic and complex...

O/Modernt Soloists, Sonoro Ensemble, Wimbledon International...

If you're going to run a music festival with flair, it's...

CD: Beck - Hyperspace

Beck stands on the front cover of his new album Hyperspace with a...

The Best Films Out Now

There are films to meet every taste in theartsdesk's guide to the best movies currently on release. In our considered opinion, any of the titles...

Ted Gioia: Music: A Subversive History review – an informati...

People who derive comfort from Classic FM’s strapline that European classical music is “The World's Greatest Music" are going to have a major...

Reissue CDs Weekly: The Clash - London Calling

In a first for this column, what’s cropping up is a cassette...

Jazz Voice, Royal Festival Hall - engulfing beauty and hidde...

Jazz Voice unfailingly supplies a gigantic sugar-rush of auditory pleasure, and this year’s edition was no exception. Arranged, scored and...

Orphée, English National Opera review – through a screen dar...

Like almost everything that it touches these days, English National Opera’s autumn season of shows rooted in the Orpheus myth has enjoyed a fairly...