mon 17/06/2024

Visual Arts Reviews

Hallyu! The Korean Wave, V&A review - frenetic but fun

Sarah Kent

Remember Gangnam Style, the music video that went viral in 2012? PSY’s cheeky lyrics and daft moves attracted 1.6 billion hits on YouTube, sparked dozens of parodies and turned the world on to K-pop. And that was just the beginning; K-pop has since mushroomed into a global phenomenon characterised by catchy tunes and fast-paced dance routines performed by beautiful young people in snappy outfits.

Read more...

Marina Abramović: Gates and Portals, Modern Art Oxford and Pitt Rivers Museum review - transcendence lite

Sarah Kent

I have powerful memories of performances by Marina Abramović. Back in 1977 at Documenta in Kassel, Germany, she and her then partner Ulay stood either side of a doorway, facing one another. There was only enough room to squeeze through sideways and, since both were naked, choosing whom to face was an interesting challenge.

Read more...

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature, National Gallery review - dump the symbolism and enjoy the drama

Sarah Kent

Across the pond Winslow Homer is a household name; in his day, he was regarded as the greatest living American painter. He was renowned especially for his seascapes and his most famous painting, The Gulf Stream, 1899/1906 (main picture) features in the National Gallery’s retrospective.

Read more...

Carolee Schneeman: Body Politics, Barbican review - challenging, in-your-face and messy

Sarah Kent

Life is messy and so is Carolee Schneeman’s work. She wanted it that way. Breaking down the barriers between art and life, between inhabiting a woman’s body and using it as primal material, was a key objective.

Read more...

Germany / The 1920s / New Objectivity / August Sander, Centre Pompidou review - expansive and thought-provoking

Juliette Bretan

The businessman in Heinrich Maria Davringhausen’s Der Schieber (The Profiteer), 1920-1921 sits several floors above the city streets, pencil in hand; the high-rise buildings pressing at the windows around him. Not in Germany. In France.

Read more...

Gustav Metzger: Earth Minus Environment, Kestle Barton review - an illuminating glimpse of a visionary activist-artist

Mark Hudson

In later life Gustav Metzger appeared a marginal, eccentric figure. The diminutive, white-bearded artist, was often to be seen round London’s galleries in the early to mid-2010s, dropping off piles of hand-produced fliers urging his fellow artists to “remember nature”.

Read more...

Milton Avery: American Colourist, Royal Academy review - from backward-looking impressionist to forward looking-colourist

Sarah Kent

I’ve always been bemused by the American painter, Milton Avery. Not having seen enough of his paintings together, I couldn’t gauge if they are quirkily naive – lodged in a cul de sac aside from the mainstream – or hyper-sophisticated harbingers of things to come.

Read more...

Eric Ravilious: Drawn to War review - a lovingly crafted documentary portrait

Saskia Baron

There’s a sharp observation, delivered in Alan Bennett’s soft tones, that sums up the reputation of the painter Eric Ravilious: “Because his paintings are so accessible, I don’t think he’s thought to be a great artist. It’s because of his charm. He’s so easy to like and things have to be hard, if they’re not hard, then they’re not great."

Read more...

Vivian Maier: Anthology, MK Gallery review - what an amazing eye!

Sarah Kent

The story is riveting. A nanny living in New York and Chicago spent her spare time wandering the streets taking photographs. She learned to develop and print, but her plan to publish the images as postcards fell through and, as time passed, she stopped bothering even to develop the negatives let alone print them.

Read more...

Venice Biennale 2022 review - The Milk of Dreams Part 2: The Arsenale

Mark Hudson

Part two of The Milk of Dreams, the central International Exhibition at the 2022 Venice Biennale, housed in the Arsenale shipyard, starts with the kind of massive, grandstanding gesture that’s necessary in a venue of this scale: a colossal bronze bust of a Black woman by American artist Simone Leigh.

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

Presumed Innocent, Apple TV+ review - you read the book and...

Scott Turow published his cunningly-wrought legal thriller in 1987, and Alan J Pakula’s powerful movie version, starring Harrison Ford, appeared...

Ashton Celebrated, Royal Ballet review - peerless delights f...

Launching a four-year global project to proclaim the genius of...

Il Trittico, Welsh National Opera review - another triumph f...

It’s somehow typical of the Welsh National Opera I’ve known now for...

Goldscheider, Royal Orchestral Society, Miller, SJSS review...

London’s non-professional orchestra sector is an undervalued asset to the city, and deserves more attention. And so last night I went to hear the...

Freud's Last Session review - Freud and CS Lewis search...

How can it be part of God’s plan to allow so much pain and suffering in the world, asks Sigmund Freud (Anthony Hopkins) of a young Oxford don, CS...

Album: Kehlani - CRASH

The noise in the international mainstream in recent years might be about dance-pop,...

Music Reissues Weekly: Margo Guryan - Words and Music

Late summer 1966. Jazz was Margo Guryan’s thing. She was not interested in pop music. This changed when she was played The Beach Boys’s “God Only...

Bach's Mass in B Minor, Collegium Vocale Gent, Herreweg...

There’s a masterful subtlety to Philippe Herreweghe’s interpretation of Bach’s last great choral work – it shuns blazing transcendence for a sense...

Sorcery review - a tale of shapeshifting revenge

Islands off the coast of southern Chile, to the Spanish and German settlers of the 19th century, represented the edge of the world. To the...