thu 22/02/2024

Visual Arts Reviews

Spain and the Hispanic World, Royal Academy review - a monumental survey

Alastair Davey

Treasures from the Hispanic Society Museum & Library are displayed as a monumental survey of Spanish art from Antiquity to the 20th century. The new exhibition stands as testament to the extraordinary vision of its founder, Archer M Huntington.

Read more...

Best of 2022: Visual Arts

Sarah Kent

Have you noticed how exhibitions now seem to go on for ever and ever? Three months seems to be the norm, but five months is not unknown. Ever wondered why? In terms of time and money, mounting a major exhibition is incredibly expensive, of course.

Read more...

Magdalena Abakanowicz, Tate Modern review - a forest of huge and imposing presences

Sarah Kent

First off, I must confess that fibre or textile art makes me queasy. I don’t know why, but all that threading, knotting, twisting, coiling and winding gives me the creeps. So it’s all the more extraordinary that I was blown away by Magdalena Abakanowicz’s huge woven sculptures.

Read more...

Things, Musée du Louvre, Paris review - the still life brought alive

mark Kidel

Only a Eurostar day-trip away, at least from London, the Louvre is hosting an exceptional exhibition, which makes the journey to Paris well worthwhile. Things – A History of Still Life (Les choses – une histoire de la nature morte) is one of those massive shows that explores a complex theme in a thoroughly original and adventurous way.

Read more...

Donna Fleming: Apocalypse, The Pie Factory, Margate review - personal passions and intense feelings

Paul Rider

Donna Fleming’s exhibition at the Pie Factory Gallery in Margate is called Apocalypse, which is confusing because it has nothing to do with the end of the world. Fleming does not even watch the news because she “does not want to think about miserable things”. Instead the title refers back to the Greek word that apocalypse is derived from, apokalypsis, which means uncovering.

Read more...

Making Modernism, Royal Academy review - a welcome if confusing intro to seven lesser known artists

Sarah Kent

The Royal Academy’s Making Modernism is a welcome introduction to seven women painters working in Germany at the beginning of the last century.

Read more...

William Kentridge, Royal Academy review - from art to theatre, and back again

Sarah Kent

South African artist William Kentridge appears on video in his studio, twice. On the right he sits scribbling, waiting for an idea to surface. Meanwhile his alter ego stands impatiently by, trying to peek at his other half’s notes and, desperate for enlightenment, even reads a recipe out loud. The artist, it seems, doesn’t have a clue; he is as much in the dark as everyone else. A Lesson in Lethargy, 2010 offers a brief moment of humour in this relentlessly dark exhibition.

Read more...

Hopper: An American Love Story review - a dry view of a much richer subject

Saskia Baron

This rather disappointing documentary about the great American painter Edward Hopper (1882-1967) has such a dry parade of experts and such a slow linear narrative that it leaves plenty of time to be frustrated by all that’s been left out.

Read more...

Lucian Freud: New Perspectives, National Gallery review - a powerful punch in the gut

Sarah Kent

There stands Lucian Freud in Reflection with Two Children (Self-portrait), 1965 (main picture) towering over you, peering mercilessly down. Is that a look of scorn on his face or merely one of detachment? His two kids seem to be squirming and giggling beneath their father’s unblinking stare. Who wouldn’t be, especially when the huge lamps hanging overhead are reminiscent of an interrogation chamber? All the better to see you with, my dear.

Read more...

Hallyu! The Korean Wave, V&A review - frenetic but fun

Sarah Kent

Remember Gangnam Style, the music video that went viral in 2012? PSY’s cheeky lyrics and daft moves attracted 1.6 billion hits on YouTube, sparked dozens of parodies and turned the world on to K-pop. And that was just the beginning; K-pop has since mushroomed into a global phenomenon characterised by catchy tunes and fast-paced dance routines performed by beautiful young people in snappy outfits.

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

An Enemy of the People, Duke of York's Theatre - perfor...

Real life is a helluva lot scarier right now than you might guess from the performative theatrics on display in the new...

Double Feature, Hampstead Theatre review - with directors li...

It’s awards season in the film world, which means that we’re currently swamped by hyperbolic shows of love and respect – actors and their...

theartsdesk Q&A: Wim Wenders on 'Perfect Days'

Wim Wenders’ latest narrative film Perfect Days might seem an uncommonly mellow work by the maker of Alice in the Cities (...

Album: Laetitia Sadier - Rooting for Love

It must be kind of unreal living in the Stereolab universe.

A band of geeky...

The Way, BBC One review - steeltown blues

This three-part drama arrives trailing clouds of big-byline...

Dance for Ukraine Gala, London Palladium review - a second r...

It’s tempting to see the second gala created by Ukrainian-born Ivan Putrov as a reflection of the shift in Ukraine’s fortunes since his first one...

Sheila Heti: Alphabetical Diaries review - an A-Z of inner l...

After a first read of the blurb for Sheila Heti’s Alphabetical Diaries, you might be forgiven for assuming that this is merely a gimmick...

Blu-ray: Jerzy Skolimowski - Walkower, Bariera, Dialóg 20-40...

Diving into this three-disc set of early films by maverick...

Kin, Series 2, BBC One review - when crime dynasties collide

The end of the first series of Kin found Dublin’s Kinsella crime family ridding themselves of bloodsucking...