wed 24/07/2024

New Music Reviews

Oil City Confidential

howard Male

Dr. Feelgood was the first band I ever saw live, and I can still remember that frisson of expectation queuing up outside the Cambridge Corn Exchange in 1975. I didn’t even know who they were or what they sounded like, I simply had some pals who were soon-to-be-punks who’d got wind of the fact that these Canvey Island ne’er-do-wells were the harbingers of something new, something borrowed, and something blue.

Read more...

Delphic, Tabernacle, W11

Bruce Dessau The Manchester Oracle

Early yesterday evening on that bastion of biting cultural analysis The One Show,  Andy McCluskey of Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark was reflecting on how his band was inspired by German techno-wizards Kraftwerk. If OMD were the children of Florian Schneider und co, then Delphic, led by another singing bassist James Cook, must be the grandchildren.

Read more...

Snowboy's History of the UK Jazz Dance Scene

sue Steward

In another lifetime, I walked into the Electric Ballroom in Camden Town through a portal into a new world: the cavernous dancehall was packed, and the "audience" being choreographed by cross-rhythms of Afro-Cuban and Brazilian ancestry in an atmosphere created by a 17-year-old jazz funk DJ called Gilles Peterson. I was witnessing the dawn of the New Jazz Age.

Read more...

Nico Muhly & the Britten Sinfonia, The Roundhouse

joe Muggs

Nico Muhly didn't have to work much to puncture any atmosphere of classical recital formality at the Roundhouse: he only needed to be himself. Young, slightly dorky and very camp, wearing a black garment that blurred the boundaries between cardigan and bathrobe, and bantering lightly with the audience, the Vermont-born New York-based composer gave the impression that he couldn't take himself too seriously if he tried.

Read more...

Stryper, O2 Academy Islington

Russ Coffey

The prefix “Christian” can invite mockery. The suffix “rock” usually makes it worse. And a Christian Rock band celebrating 25 years in yellow and black Spandex? Surely that has to be a spoof. But I have news for you: Eighties Californian glam metal band Stryper are real, back, and tonight they rocked.

Read more...

Richard Hawley, Royal Festival Hall

Bruce Dessau

"So, we made it eventually." Having postponed this show two weeks ago due to the M1 doubling as a skating rink, Richard Hawley opened not with a song but an apology. It was hardly necessary. The sold-out Royal Festival Hall last night was prepared to forgive Sheffield's second-finest songsmith - after his chum Jarvis Cocker - almost anything.

Read more...

Way to Blue: The Songs of Nick Drake, Barbican

joe Muggs

The dominant look among all ages of the sell-out audience at the Barbican Hall last night was distinctly “smart-Bohemian”, with plenty of thick-rimmed specs, duffle coats and subtly outré hairdos visible as they took their seats and gave one another knowing nods on spotting the “Fruit Tree” motif in the stage décor. For Nick Drake, the fragile Cambridge-born singer-songwriter who died of an overdose of antidepressants in 1974 aged 26, is perhaps the perfect cult artist: utterly singular, too...

Read more...

Brian Eno - Another Green World, BBC Four

Adam Sweeting

I’ve never been quite sure whether Brian Eno is a musician, or somebody for whom music happens to be the end product of a chain of cognitive processes. Certainly it was music that powered him to prominence, either as the inventor of ambient music, a performer with Roxy Music, or as a collaborator with artists ranging from rock gods U2 and David Bowie to composers Harold Budd and Philip Glass.

Read more...

Rupa & the April Fishes, Rich Mix

howard Male

I used to argue that there was no such thing as a World Music style, in the sense that, say, indie music or trad jazz are fairly sonically delineated. But now I’m not so sure. Over the past decade or so, most cosmopolitan cities in the world have probably produced at least one band with a line-up that invariably includes an accordion player, a double bassist (rather than a bass guitarist), a violinist (just the one), maybe a horn player or two, and a multi-lingual vocalist.

Read more...

Astral Social Club at Catch, Shoreditch

joe Muggs The genial noise-generator Neil Campbell aka Astral Social Club

Neil Campbell is a one-man subculture. In 30 years of music-making in various configurations of improvised rock, psychedelia and electronics, he has released hundreds of hours of recordings, mainly in micro-editions of home-produced cassette, CD or mp3, and collaborated endlessly with a global network of musicians that have fallen through the cracks of genre or stylistic allegiance. Since separating from Leeds-based guitar drone group Vibracathedral Orchestra in 2006, he has mainly concentrated...

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 15,000 pieces, we're asking for £5 per month or £40 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take a subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

10 Questions for DJ-producer Dave Clarke

Dave Clarke (b. 1968) is, arguably, Britain’s greatest techno...

Album: The Very Things GXL - Mr Arc-Eye (Under a Cellophane...

Back in the mid-80s, a group of lads from Worcestershire, who’d previously been known as the Cravats, were putting an exceedingly strange spin on...

Prom 5, BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Bancroft review - a...

This looked like a classic Prom in the grand old BBC tradition: two big but lesser-known pieces by pivotal figures (Schoenberg and Zemlinsky)...

Madeleine Peyroux, Barbican review - a transport of delight

You can take the woman out of the Left Bank, but you can’t take the Left Bank out of the woman. Madeleine Peyroux would be perfectly at home in a...

Red Speedo, Orange Tree Theatre review - two versions of Ame...

Before Lucas Hnath wrote Red Speedo, he had heard a 2004 speech at a hearing investigating baseball doping that declared the...

Album: Kevin Fowley - À Feu Doux

“Ne pleure pas, Jeannette” is a version of the 15th-century French song "La pernette se lève." It tells the story of Jeannette, whose parents want...

In a Violent Nature review - inverted slasher is fascinating...

A group of young people rent a cabin in the woods. A masked killer lingers nearby. Surely you know how the rest unfolds. The...

Music Reissues Weekly: Barry Ryan - The Albums 1969-1979

In April 1985, The Damned’s Dave Vanian was speaking with Janice Long on her BBC Radio 1 show. He said “Barry Ryan and Paul Ryan have been sadly...

ECHO, LIFT 2024, Royal Court review - enriching journey into...

The Iranian playwright Nassim Soleimanpour is many things, some seemingly contradictory: a) a clever, poetic playwright who uses high-...

Crossing review - a richly human journey of discovery

Crossing is a remarkable step forward for Swedish-Georgian...