sun 29/05/2022

New Music Reviews

Music Reissues Weekly: John Barry - The More Things Change

Kieron Tyler

By 1970, John Barry had composed music for Born Free, The Lion in Winter, Midnight Cowboy, You Only Live Twice and about 38 other films. His work with cinema began in 1960 and averaged around five films a year. In 1965, eight films were released with his music. He was busy.

Read more...

Music Reissues Weekly: Patty Waters - You Loved Me

Kieron Tyler

“Touched by Rodin in a Paris Museum” is a 14-minute consideration of exactly what its title says: the impact of encountering Auguste Rodin’s work in person. The composition features piano only. There are nods to Debussy and Ravel. The playing is measured and minimal yet still full-bodied. At odd points, there are seconds of complete silence.

Read more...

MØ, Heaven, London review - snappy, sexy and energised

Thomas H Green

“I live to survive another heartache/I live to survive another mistake,” roars a sold-out Heaven. It’s a new song but everyone seems to know it. It’s not MØ’s most famous song but is the bluntest monster banger of the night, crunching four-to-the-floor club-pop that brooks no argument. It’s the last of the set (prior to an encore) and MØ is now a perspiring ball of energy.

Read more...

Tallies, Old Blue Last review - Canadian quintet rejuvenates indie prototypes

Kieron Tyler

Toronto’s Tallies have acknowledged their fondness for Aztec Camera, The Smiths and The Sundays. Add Cocteau Twins into the building blocks, too. Encountering a band so strongly immersed in the back catalogues of familiar names can obscure what’s really notable about them. Do they transcend their influences?

Read more...

Charli XCX, O2 Academy, Glasgow review - sweat-drenched pop amid feverish atmosphere

Jonathan Geddes

“This town makes me sweat”, declared Charlotte Aitchison at one point in this set, as she took a brief breather between songs. The 29-year-old should have tried being in the audience, for this was a sweat-drenched evening right from the opening seconds, with a wildly devoted crowd which congregated into a heaving mass rapidly and consistently.

Read more...

The Great Escape 2022, Brighton review - sunshine, queues, and thrilling new bands

Caspar Gomez

My friend George claims to have nightmares about The Great Escape. In them he’s standing in an endless queue, never reaching the front, never entering the venue, and never seeing the band he wants to see. That was his experience the only time he attended, and he consequently reckons The Great Escape is rubbish.

“I’ve been going for years and that’s never happened to me,” I said to him.

“Yeah, well, you’re press, aren’t you,” he responded, with only a smidgeon of bitterness.

Read more...

Music Reissues Weekly: 999 - A Punk Rock Anthology

Kieron Tyler

“Ramonic buzzsaw impressionism guitars lovingly poured like a truckload of Quaker Oats over the indecipherable lyrical content that sounds like a rancid moggie that has snorted too much Pro-Plus.”

So that was a possible thumbs-up from NME’s Tony Parsons in his review of 999’s August 1977 debut single “I’m Alive.”

Read more...

Transgressive Records showcase, The Great Escape, Brighton review - five acts offer intriguing pop alternatives

Thomas H Green

Onstage at The Old Market in Hove, New York’s Mykki Blanco has been waving around a knot of garlic bulbs as if it were a wand or occult aspergillum. At some point during Blanco’s punchy rendition of 2016 single “Loner”, or possibly the dizzier “Summer Fling”, they transfer it to the flies of their trousers, let it hang there, all mischief. They explain that this is the result of the band becoming obsessed with “a mad coven of witches in Italy”.

Read more...

theartsdesk in Estonia: Tallinn-Narva Music Week review - solidarity through music on the Russian border

Kieron Tyler

The gentleman in the centre of the picture above is Ivan Dorn. In Ukraine, he’s a pop star. A big pop star. His music, as he puts it on stage during the show opening Tallinn-Narva Music Week, is “pure Ukrainian house music.” Yep, there’s the bing-bong piano lines and cowbell beats of the pop end of house.

Read more...

alt-J, Barrowland, Glasgow review - unlikely anthems from the shadows

Jonathan Geddes

Prior to alt-j’s encore getting underway their video wall switched to the Ukrainian flag. “Fuck Putin!” bellowed keyboardist Gus Unger-Hamilton, to hearty roars of approval, in what was both a brief reminder of the outside world beyond the increasingly humid Barrowland and also a look at the band themselves and their own emotions, which otherwise remained distant during this show.

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

Music Reissues Weekly: John Barry - The More Things Change

By 1970, John Barry had composed music for Born Free, The Lion in Winter, Midnight Cowboy, You Only Live Twice...

Elizabeth: A Portrait in Parts review - she is a human being

Roger Michell’s films described a range of Englishness, from Notting Hill’s foppish comedy to acerbically humane Hanif Kureishi scripts...

Girl on an Altar, Kiln Theatre review - machismo, murder and...

Playwrights return to classical myths for two main reasons – to shine a light on how we live today and because they're bloody good yarns.

...

First Person: Christina McMaster - seeking musical cures for...

In 2020, during a gentle easing of lockdown restrictions, I was asked to play for the Culture Clinic sessions at Kings Place, a creative...

Album: Yama Warashi - Crispy Moon

Crispy Moon is a musical kaleidoscope encompassing free-jazz skronk,...

Between Two Worlds review - Juliette Binoche, maid in Franc...

For die-hard Juliette Binoche fans – don’t cross us, we get angry – Between Two Worlds is heaven. The...

Samson et Dalila, Royal Opera review - from austerity to exc...

Words and situations are one-dimensional, but the music is chameleonic, if not profound, and crafted with a master’s hand. What to do about ...

Henry VIII, Shakespeare's Globe review - unashamedly vu...

Boris Johnson was of course not the first British leader to engineer a split with Europe for...

Luzzu review - a Maltese fisherman struggles with modernity

In Maltese-American Alex Camilleri’s debut feature, it’s a case of follow the swordfish. This terrifically atmospheric, almost documentary-like...