sun 03/12/2023

New Music Reviews

Music Reissues Weekly: In the Light of Time - UK Post-Rock and Leftfield Pop 1992-1998

Kieron Tyler

“In the Light of Time” was the second track on Side One of April 1995’s Further, the third album by Bristol’s Flying Saucer Attack. At the time, Further felt like a hyper-vaporous take on shoegazing infused with touches of British folk. Attitudinally and temporally, Slowdive’s February 1995 third album Pygmalion wasn’t too far.

Read more...

Tirzah, The Colour Factory review - dry ice and bedroom beats

India Lewis

Less than ten days after (surprise) releasing her new album, trip9love…???, Tirzah took to a small stage in Hackney Wick to play it through (in order), wreathed enigmatically in dry ice.

Read more...

Music Reissues Weekly: David Westlake - D87

Kieron Tyler

Becoming reacquainted with what was originally titled Westlake in 1987 is a pleasure. Yes, at his own measured pace, David Westlake has issued great albums since then and his Eighties and Nineties band The Servants have been the subject of various archive releases. It is not as though he has vanished. But any reminder of his flair as a songwriter is welcome.

Read more...

theartsdesk on Vinyl 79: Primal Scream, Girl Ray, Mort Garson, Barbie, Nina Simone, Dengue Fever and more

Thomas H Green

VINYL OF THE MONTH

African Head Charge A Trip to Bolgatanga (On-U Sound)

Read more...

Hardanger Musikkfest 2023 review - fertility, folk music and the supernatural unite along Norway’s fjords

Kieron Tyler

The cows are scattered across the mountains. Without scrambling up the slopes, the only way to summon them is to call. Unni Løvlid is beckoning them. Instead of standing outdoors she is in the medieval Ullensvang Church, in the Norwegian village of Lofthus. She uses the interior of a grand piano to get the necessary resonance, the echo which distant animals would hear.

Read more...

Supersonic Festival 2023, Birmingham review - musical eccentrics battle the odds and come out on top

Guy Oddy

You’ve got to feel for Lisa Meyer and the team behind Birmingham’s magnificent Supersonic Festival. Just as the live music scene gets to a point where the Covid pandemic is no longer a malign influence on dancing and having fun in a room full of like-minded people, the UK is hit by a two-day rail strike that coincides with this annual shindig of the musically wild and wonderful. On top of that, our loathsome Home Secretary refused to grant a visa for Day One’s headline act, MC Yalla.

Read more...

Music Reissues Weekly: March of the Flower Children - The American Sounds of 1967

Kieron Tyler

“March of the Flower Children” was a June 1967 B-side by Los Angeles psych-punks The Seeds. The track was extracted from their third album Future, a peculiar dive into psychedelia which was as tense as it was turned on. While the song’s lyrics referenced a “field of flowers,” a “painted castle” and a sky “painted golden yellow” the mood was jittery, unstable.

Read more...

Medicine Festival review - the new New Age gathers in leafy Berkshire

Peter Culshaw

Fia is a Swedish singer with a crystalline voice and a ear for a great melody - her singalong choruses are not typical for a festival Friday night headliner, like getting the audience to join in with “Sit with your pain/ cradle it close/ and when you’re ready/ Let it go.” This had a hypnotic effect on the audience, more mass therapy than a having a good time.

Read more...

Music Reissues Weekly: Keith Levene and The Clash

Kieron Tyler

Forty-seven years ago this week, a new band called The Clash were seen by a paying audience in London for the first time. On Sunday 29 August 1976 they played Islington’s Screen on the Green cinema, billed between Manchester’s Buzzcocks – their earliest London show – and rising luminaries Sex Pistols. Doors opened at midnight. The anniversary needs marking.

Read more...

Album: Slowdive - Everything is Alive

Kieron Tyler

Everything is Alive opens with all that could be wanted from a Slowdive album. “Shanty” is just-under six minutes of out-of-focus, shimmering aural fog in which guitars throb and drums are a distant pulse. An acid-house-type heartbeat is offset against a harpsichord-like refrain recalling Broadcast. Lines drift in about a burning candle and the arrival of night. It all seems to be about the passing of time.

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

Music Reissues Weekly: Myriam Gendron - Not So Deep As A Wel...

Myriam Gendron's debut album Not So Deep As A Well was originally released in 2014 by Feeding Tube, a US label run by...

Powell and Pressburger: In Prospero’s Room

There’s a thread of bright magic running through British...

Eileen review - a dank fairytale film noir

As the title character in Eileen, set in a miserable Massachusetts backwater in the days before Christmas 1964, Thomasin McKenzie plays a...

A Sherlock Carol, Marylebone Theatre review - merry, but mir...

It’s an elementary fact that Dickens sells at this time of year — look at all the perennial Christmas Carols sprouting up everywhere. But...

Fallen Leaves review - deliciously dry Finnish romcom

Fallen Leaves is Aki Kaurismäki’s 20th film, the one the...

Album: Shirley Hurt - Shirley Hurt

The realisation that Shirley Hurt is the name assumed by Canada’...

Macbeth, The Depot, Liverpool review - Ralph Fiennes leads a...

Next door to the beautiful Art Deco Littlewoods Pools Building, nearly 30 years standing derelict, a set of grey sheds stand, a seat of...

Peter Pan Goes Wrong, Lyric Theatre review - adult panto del...

Mischief Theatre set themselves a big challenge when they evolved their brand of knowing slapstick. And not just about how to destroy...

Queendom review - an LGBTQ+ performance artist takes to the...

It takes a brave or a foolhardy person to walk the streets wearing almost nothing but barbed wire and platform shoes, especially when the occasion...

Album: Ghost Woman - Hindsight Is 50/50

Ghost Woman’s 2022 self-titled album and this January’s swift follow-up Anne, If were both fairly laidback and spaced out affairs, with...