thu 23/05/2024

New Music Reviews

Disney 100 - The Concert, OVO Hydro, Glasgow review - a slick tour of the Magic Kingdom

Jonathan Geddes

There are a few perils to saying supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, as Janette Manrara discovered on this opening night of Disney’s anniversary arena jaunt. Trying to divide the Glasgow crowd into sections to sing the song, Manrara tripped over who was to sing what, something only notable because the rest of the evening was possessed of an almost overpowering slickness.

Read more...

theartsdesk on Vinyl 77: Scuba, Dannii Minogue, Tito Puente, ABBA, The Undertones, Oracle Sisters and more

Thomas H Green

VINYL OF THE MONTH

Rahill Flowers at Your Feet (Big Dada)

Read more...

Jaminaround, Ancient Technology Centre, Dorset review - music in the round that delights

mark Kidel

The circular form of the large turf-roofed round house at the Ancient Technology Centre in Cranborne, Dorset, is tailor-made for music in the round. The latest in the series of Jaminaround concerts made the most of the intimacy that the venue provides, with music that engaged the audience in a way that conventional staging makes difficult.

Read more...

Music Reissues Weekly: Folk, Funk & Beyond - The Arrangements Of John Cameron

Kieron Tyler

Donovan’s “Sunshine Superman” was the UK’s first explicitly psychedelic record. Although there were delays with it hitting shops, it was recorded in December 1965. A large part of its impact came through the instrumentation and arrangement. Jazz players were on board, playing in a folky way without abandoning their core musical sensibilities. The ground-breaking arranger responsible was John Cameron.

Read more...

Gretchen Peters, Cadogan Hall review - writer and performer of exquisite gems

Liz Thomson

It’s 27 years since Gretchen Peters released her debut album, The Secret of Life, championed by Bob Harris and the late Terry Wogan, whose morning-tide enthusiasms also helped propel Eva Cassidy and Beth Neilsen Chapman to success - the term “Americana” hadn’t yet been invented!

Read more...

Jim Jones Allstars, Hare & Hounds, Birmingham review - veteran garage punkers turn up the soul

Guy Oddy

Jim Jones has been around the block a few times, plying his garage/punk/rock’n’roll schtick – most notably with his last couple of outfits, the Jim Jones Revue and Jim Jones and the Righteous Mind. Back in the ring with his new crew, the Jim Jones Allstars, however, he’s subtly changed the template to bring some serious old school rhythm and blues to the party as well.

Read more...

Father John Misty sings Scott Walker, Barbican review - edging towards the supernatural

Kieron Tyler

A standing ovation part-way through a concert is unusual. Conductor Jules Buckley gestures to the members of the BBC Symphony Orchestra and the BBC Symphony Chorus that they should rise. Beside Buckley, Father John Misty stands looking from the conductor to everyone else on the stage, to the audience. Seemingly, in the midst of this, he’s thrown.

Read more...

Music Reissues Weekly: Cock Sparrer - The Decca Years

Kieron Tyler

“This is a record company’s idea of new wave. Clichéd heavy metal riffs and someone shouting in a cockney voice. This is a con and I hate it”.

Read more...

Songlines Encounters, Kings Place review - moments of magic

Tim Cumming

These encounters are ones that may lead to lifelong relationships, with the halls at Kings Place this coming weekend filled with music from Mali, Colombia, Turkey, Georgia, Estonia, Tibet and a woodland in Sussex.

Read more...

Tallinn Music Week 2023 review - when music is unavoidably the language of freedom

Kieron Tyler

Estonia’s Mart Avi styles himself as “the twilight samurai of alternative pop”. He creates “nowhere-somewhere music, mapping uncharted territories between avant-pop and timeless grandeur”. The characterisations are issued via AVICORP, his internet presence.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 15,000 pieces, we're asking for £5 per month or £40 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take a subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Richard III, Shakespeare's Globe review - Michelle Terr...

There’s a fierce, dark energy to the Globe’s new Richard III that I don’t recall at that venue for a fair while. The drilled cast dances...

Kolesnikov, Wigmore Hall review - celestial navigation throu...

Like his baggy white suit, pitched somewhere between Liberace and Colonel Sanders, Pavel Kolesnikov’s playing was spotless at the...

Between Riverside and Crazy, Hampstead Theatre review - race...

It’s often said that contemporary American playwrights are too polite, too afraid of giving offence. But this accusation can’t be levelled at...

Album: Isobel Campbell - Bow to Love

Isobel Campbell has maintained a consistent career on the fringes of popular music for three decades. She's made a home in the area where...

'I think of her as a proto-punk': documentarist Sv...

Anita Pallenberg was a vital presence in the Stones’ most vital years. Her bright eyes and hungry mouth betrayed a ferocious appetite for pleasure...

Passing Strange, Young Vic review - exuberant pocket musical...

From New York’s Public Theater, the venue that nurtured Hamilton, comes another estimable pocket...

theartsdesk Q&A: Eddie Marsan and the American Revolutio...

He’s not the kind of actor who has paparazzi following him...

Album: Samana - Samana

The final track of Samana’s third album is titled “The Preselis,” after the west Welsh mountain range – the place antiquarians suggested as the...

The Great Escape Festival 2024, Brighton review - 12 hours o...

If the weather’s good TGE Beach is a grand start to a day. As it sounds, it’s a purpose-built seafront space to the east of central...

DVD/Blu-ray: Billy Connolly - Big Banana Feet

The most striking thing about the 1976 documentary (restored and re-released by the BFI) is just how polite Billy Connolly comes across as. Not...