sat 18/01/2020

Comedy Reviews

Flo and Joan, Soho Theatre review - sisters in satirical harmony

Veronica Lee

Flo and Joan are sisters (Nicola and Rosie Dempsey: they have borrowed their stage names from their nan and her sister) and you may have recently seen them on television doing advertisements for Nationwide. Others may know them from social media, and their runaway hit “The 2016 Song” about music fans' annus horribilis with the deaths of David Bowie and Prince.

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Ed Byrne, Touring review - the perils of modern fatherhood

Veronica Lee

Ed Byrne is a worried parent. Thankfully his two young sons are hale and hearty, but he is concerned he may be bringing up a pair of pampered, Lord Fauntleroy youngsters, and in Spoiler Alert he ponders the differences between his experience of being parented as a child in the 1980s, and now being a dad himself.

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Angela Barnes, Soho Theatre review - history with great gags

Veronica Lee

It's always nice to come away from a show having learned something and Angela Barnes, history buff and a woman with an obsession some may consider weird (more of which later), certainly fills in a lot of historical detail in Fortitude.

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Daliso Chaponda, Touring review - uneven but entertaining

Veronica Lee

You may have seen Daliso Chaponda on Britain's Got Talent last year. He came third but, as he says, he was delighted as it brought him to a wider audience after working in comedy for 15 years – and made possible his first UK tour What the African Said

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Score review - breathless dash through music and film

David Kettle

The crucial yet almost indefinable role of music in film – it’s a subject ripe for exploration and celebration, from the musicological technicalities of leitmotifs and ostinatos, through to the colourful characters working to bring directors’ sometimes vague musical notions to sonic reality. All of which gets raced through in this jam-packed documentary by first-time director Matt Schrader, a...

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Simon Evans, Soho Theatre review - intellect examined

Veronica Lee

Simon Evans, at 52, is far too young to be a grumpy old man, but he’s doing his best to prepare for the role, with this amusingly dyspeptic standup show at Soho Theatre about the ageing process, and how the evolutionary model appears to be moving backwards.

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Craig Hill, Glasgow International Comedy Festival review - sweary and filthy fun

Veronica Lee

The Glasgow International Comedy Festival kicked off with a performance by one of its most popular performers, Craig Hill, a comic far better known in his native Scotland than south of the border. That may be because his shtick relies so much on knowing the ins and outs of Scottish social classification – anyone from Fife, Paisley or Aberdeen was fair game for insults here, but non-Scots may be none the wiser.

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Fern Brady, Soho Theatre review - opinions with raw edge

Veronica Lee

Fern Brady is a young Scot with plenty of provocative opinions – on politics, society and relationships – with a delivery that can only be described as dry as a desert. It means that some pieces of information – as well as a few gags – take some time to pass through the “Is she joking?” filter. 

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Rose Matafeo, Soho Theatre review - sassy and she knows it

Veronica Lee

New Zealand comic Rose Matafeo is a fan of romcoms and has decided she is destined to appear in one at some point in her career.

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Hannah Gadsby, Soho Theatre review - misogyny explored

Veronica Lee

Hannah Gadsby was awarded best show (jointly with John Robins) at the 2017 Edinburgh Comedy Awards for Nanette, which had already been given the equally prestigious Barry award at last year's Melbourne Comedy Festival.

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