tue 21/05/2019

Comedy Reviews

Al Murray as the Pub Landlord, Embassy Theatre Skegness review - comic pulls his punches

Veronica Lee

Al Murray's Pub Landlord character has been around since the mid-1990s. As such, it's a wonder that Murray has managed to reinvent the embittered, xenophobic loudmouth so many times, but he has – and the EU referendum in 2016 should have, you may have thought, given the character new life or killed him off altogether.

Read more...

Ruby Wax, Brighton Festival 2019 review - how to be human

Katie Colombus

Once the self proclaimed poster girl for mental illness, Ruby Wax has evolved her stand up act, because, as she puts it, “everyone has mental illness now. It spread like wildfire.”

Read more...

Andy Hamilton, Brighton Festival 2019 review - gently amusing night of reminiscence

Thomas H Green

Taking place at the Theatre Royal, Andy Hamilton’s show is entitled An Evening with… rather than a straight stand-up and mainly consists of the comedy writer/performer and gameshow regular answering audience questions. During the first half this is done via raising a hand and shouting out questions; during the second half by leaving pieces of paper on the stage front during the interval.

Read more...

Seann Walsh, Broadway, Letchworth Garden City review - Strictly's bad boy tells his story

Veronica Lee

Let's start with that kiss – the one that propelled Seann Walsh from “Who?” in last year's Strictly Come Dancing line-up to being the “bad boy” of the series after pictures of his drunken late-night clinch with Katya Jones, his married professional dance partner, appeared in the tabloids.

Read more...

Reginald D Hunter, Princes Hall Aldershot review - underpowered but the laughs come through

Veronica Lee

Reginald D Hunter drops the n-bomb near the top of the show. He means no offence, he tells the audience, but it's the vernacular where he comes from in Georgia.

Read more...

Krater Comedy Club, Brighton Komedia 25th Birthday review - a south coast institution celebrates

Thomas H Green

The Komedia is a Brighton Institution and celebrates its birthday tonight in a suitably raucous fashion. The Komedia began in 1994, founded by the directors of the Umbrella Theatre Company, and styled on the cabaret spaces they’d experienced touring Europe.

Read more...

Mark Thomas, BAC review - impassioned polemic about the NHS

Veronica Lee

Mark Thomas issues a health warning for Check-Up: Our NHS at 70  at Battersea Arts Centre  – “This show contains swearing, a video of an operation on a stomach and a description of being in A&E when a patient dies.” Indeed it does, but it also contains a heartfelt love letter to the health service Thomas was born in and, as a lifelong socialist, hopes to die in.

Read more...

Britney, Soho Theatre review - finding the funny in a brain tumour

Veronica Lee

A brain tumour isn't usually the subject of a comedy show but Britney, written and performed by comedy duo Charly Clive and Ellen Robertson, is just that. It's “the true story of what happens to two best friends when one of them [Clive] gets a brain tumour” – the size of a golf ball, her father helpfully pointed out.

Read more...

Tommy Tiernan, Shepherd's Bush Empire review - playful and poetic

Veronica Lee

Tommy Tiernan is something of an institution in his native Ireland, as a stand-up comic, newspaper columnist, sometime chat show host and full-time controversialist. Now his appearance as Da Gerry in Channel 4's Derry Girls has brought him to a wider audience – both geographically and generationally – and deservedly so.

Read more...

Angela Barnes, Blackheath Halls review - a pessimist turning the tables

Veronica Lee

Angela Barnes is one of life’s pessimists, she tells us at the top of the hour, but she’s trying not to be so world-weary, and to turn negatives into positives. And, while there’s so much awfulness going on around us, why not try to lighten the mood a little?

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Hatton Garden, ITV review - ancient burglars bore again

Have we passed peak Hatton Garden? It’s now four years since a gang of old lags pulled off the biggest...

Primal Scream, The Haunt, Brighton review - up-close, short,...

Primal Scream have played in this city, in the recent past, at the 4500 capacity...

First Person: Conductor Maxime Pascal on Stockhausen at the...

Stockhausen stands alongside Monteverdi and Beethoven as a composer who exploded the understanding of his art. Stockhausen deeply changed the...

Anish Kapoor, Lisson Gallery review - naïve vulgarity and ot...

There's children screaming in a nearby playground. Their voices rise and fall, swell and drop. Interspersed silences fill with the sound of...

Blu-ray: The Woman in the Window

The Woman in the Window (1944) was the first of the two riveting...

Game of Thrones, Sky Atlantic, Series 8 Finale review – who...

WARNING - CONTAINS SPOILERS! And so it’s over. Eight years of thrilling, fantastical, often emotionally devastating, in some senses ground-...

Sting and Shaggy, Roundhouse review - wilfully uncool and ir...

Musical odd couples don't come much stranger than Sting and Shaggy. Last night, at the...

La Damnation de Faust, Glyndebourne review – bleak and compe...

Mid-career, moving ever further away from composing for concert platform and church towards the stage,...