sat 25/05/2019

Comedy Reviews

Katherine Ryan, Garrick Theatre review - feminism with extra sass

Veronica Lee

Katherine Ryan was making her West End debut – a big moment in any comic’s career – but she made her entrance on stage at the Garrick unannounced. Yet if the opening to Glitter Room was strangely underwhelming, it wasn’t long before the Canadian’s trademark waspish style was to the fore and the sass kicked in.

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The League of Gentlemen Live Again!, Sunderland Empire review - going local for local people

Veronica Lee

When the League of Gentlemen – Mark Gatiss, Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton, plus non-performing writer Jeremy Dyson – reformed for an excellent series to update us on events in Royston Vasey (“portal to another world, or just a shit hole?”) for the BBC last year, they enjoyed it so much that they announced a tour for 2018, their first live show since late 2005.

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018: Rose Matafeo review

Veronica Lee

As we enter the venue, Rose Matafeo is playing a game of mini table tennis with a member of the audience. Nothing that follows seems to relate to this “just a bit of fun to start the show” – but, trust me, it's one of the cleverest bits of misdirection you will ever see.

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018 reviews: Rosie Jones/ Marcus Brigstocke/ Alice Snedden

Veronica Lee

Rosie Jones ★★★

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018: Luisa Omielan/ Brennan Reece/ Olga Koch

Veronica Lee

Luisa Omielan ★★★★

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018 reviews: Ari Shaffir/ Ashley Blaker/ Janeane Garofalo

Veronica Lee

Ari Shaffir ★★★★

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018 reviews: Alex Edelman/ Jayde Adams/ Kieran Hodgson

Veronica Lee

 

Alex Edelman ★★★★

When Alex Edelman first appeared at the Edinburgh Fringe in 2014 he walked off with the Edinburgh Comedy Award for best newcomer. Now in his third stand-up show, Just For Us, he delivers a beautifully constructed hour of narrative comedy.

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018 reviews: Catherine Bohart / Norris & Parker / Pelican

Veronica Lee

Catherine Bohart ★★★★

Catherine Bohart tells us at the top of the show that she is the bisexual daughter of an Irish Catholic deacon, which is, when you consider it, a niche description. Oh, and she has OCD. That’s quite an introduction, and she more than lives up to it in this debut show, Immaculate.

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Flight of the Conchords review, Eventim Apollo - New Zealand musical spoofers make welcome return

Veronica Lee

When Flight of the Conchords first played at the Edinburgh Fringe they were a sleeper hit, championed by other comics and loved by critics.

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Bridget Christie, Brighton Festival review - politics through a domestic lens

Veronica Lee

Bridget Christie tells us at the top of the show that she is a heterosexual, able-bodied, privileged white female – so why is she feeling so discontented?

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