wed 20/03/2019

Film Interviews

10 Questions for Director Hong Khaou

Katherine McLaughlin

I sit down with Cambodian-born, London-based director Hong Khaou to talk about his experience making his first feature film, Lilting, which showed at Sundance film festival in competition, took home the award for best cinematography in the world cinema category, and opened the 28th BFI London Lesbian & Gay Film Festival to great acclaim.  A cheery mood fills the room, his softly-spoken, intelligent musings inflected with an excitability which is utterly endearing.

Read more...

10 Questions for Director Annemarie Jacir

Tom Birchenough

In 2007 Annemarie Jacir made her debut feature, Salt of This Sea, the first film directed by a Palestinian woman director. Her follow-up, When I Saw You, is released this week in the UK, after festival acclaim that saw it receive prizes at Berlinale 2012 (the Netpac award for “Best Asian Film”) and “Best Arab Film” at the Abu Dhabi Film Festival.

Read more...

10 Questions for Filmmaker Bill Forsyth

Jasper Rees

You'll recall the scene where the title comes true in Gregory’s Girl. Gregory, a gawky, puzzled teenager played by John Gordon Sinclair, has finally hooked up with a girl. They spend a long evening dreamily kissing and listing their favourite numbers. “A million and nine," suggests Susan, played by Clare Grogan, after a long last smooch on his doorstep.

Read more...

10 Questions for Director Lukas Moodysson

Emma Simmonds

The Swedish writer-director Lukas Moodysson first burst onto the scene in 1998 with the chaotically romantic Show Me Love (original title Fucking Åmål), a story of a love affair between two teenage girls which shocks a small Swedish town.

Read more...

Celluloid Man: Preserving the heritage of Indian cinema

Tom Birchenough

This April is proving the kindest month for cinephiles. Hot on the heels of Mark Cousins’ engrossing A Story of Children and Film comes another documentary about cinema of captivating, encyclopaedic interest, Shivendra Singh Dungarpur’s Celluloid Man. The director’s immediate subject is PK Nair, the man who created India’s National Film Archive (NFA).

Read more...

Q&A Special: Stranger by the Lake

Demetrios Matheou

Stranger by the Lake is something of a wonder, a superbly made amalgam of Hitchcockian psychological thriller and explicit homoerotica, whose very presence in commercial cinemas defies convention. Yet the sheer quality of Frenchman Alain Guiraudie’s film can’t be denied.

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Biographer Claire Tomalin on Charles Dickens

Jasper Rees

The tally of Charles Dickens’s biographers grows ever closer to 100. The English language’s most celebrated novelist repays repeated study, of course, because both his life and his work are so remarkably copious: the novels, the journals, the letters, the readings; the charitable works, the endless walks; the awful childhood, the army of children, the abruptly terminated marriage, the puzzling relationship with two sisters-in-law, the long and clandestine affair.

Read more...

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Best Character Actor

Jasper Rees

The news that Philip Seymour Hoffman has died at the age of only 46 robs cinema of - almost unarguably - the greatest screen actor of the age, and certainly its outstanding character actor. Where once there was Charles Laughton, or Ernest Borgnine, for the past two decades there has been Philip Seymour Hoffman. They are all great film actors whom fate has fashioned in doughy clumps of misshapen flesh.

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Writer Hanif Kureishi and director Roger Michell

Demetrios Matheou

The careers of writer Hanif Kureishi and director Roger Michell are indelibly linked, with a collaboration that has now lasted 20 years. In 1993 Michell, then an accomplished theatre director who was relatively new to the camera, directed Kureishi’s adaptation of his novel The Buddha of Suburbia for the BBC, with great success.

Read more...

10 Questions for Atom Egoyan

Nick Hasted

Schoolchildren drowning under a frozen lake in their crashed bus is the image most people still associate with Atom Egoyan.

Read more...

The Woody Allen story: 'Why do I feel like I got screwed?'

Jasper Rees

Woody Allen once joked that he would prefer to achieve immortality not through his work but through not dying. He is now 77 and the inevitable is a lot nearer than it was when he first realised, aged five, that this doesn’t go on forever. Fear of death has powered the furious productivity that in the early days yielded jokes by the yard, then the films appearing year upon year.

Read more...

10 Questions for Joss Whedon

Emma Dibdin

Few heroes of cult genre television ever manage the transition into mainstream financial success – although JJ Abrams hasn't been doing too badly for himself – and for many years Joss Whedon's deified status among fans of his various lovingly crafted, emotionally rich series was not reflected by broader recognition. 

Read more...

10 Questions for Writer David Mitchell

Jasper Rees

“If you show someone something you’ve written, you give them a sharpened stake, lie down in your coffin and say, ‘When you’re ready.’” The words belong to Jason Taylor, the stammering 13-year-old poet protagonist of David Mitchell's novel Black Swan Green. But they will do for any artist presenting fresh work. Mitchell is going through an extracurricular phase of presenting fresh work to a different kind of audience.

Read more...

10 Questions for François Ozon

Demetrios Matheou

François Ozon is one of France’s most mercurial directors, his country’s equivalent, in some respects, to our own Michael Winterbottom – prolific, and constantly on the move between genres. He’s made a musical (8 Women), a marital drama (5x2), a murder mystery (Swimming Pool), a period melodrama (Angel), political satire (Potiche) and a poignant drama about a young man coping with his imminent death (Time to Leave), among others.

Read more...

Interview: Film Director Matteo Garrone

Nick Hasted

When Matteo Garrone’s sixth film Gomorrah won the 2008 Grand Prix at Cannes, it announced Italian cinema’s resurrection to the world. When his follow-up, Reality, won the 2012 Grand Prix, opinion was more divided.

Read more...

Q&A Special: The Making of Local Hero

Jasper Rees

Local Hero was released 30 years ago this weekend. No British film from the Eighties can lay claim to quite such lasting and deep-seated affection as Bill Forsyth’s modest masterpiece – not even Chariots of Fire, which was David Puttnam’s previous triumph as a producer. Though not a great commercial success at first – it had a limited release in America – it went on to bloom on VHS and DVD. It also has an asteroid named after it (the 7345 Happer, for the record).

The...

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

Bach St John Passion, Les Arts Florissants, Christie, Barbic...

William Christie kicked off Passion season in London this year with a particularly sombre reading of the...

Shetland, Series 5 Finale, BBC One review - Sicario-on-Sea?

Thing is, a lot of this unpleasantness could have been avoided if DI...

The Rubenstein Kiss, Southwark Playhouse review - slick spy...

It's an ideal time to revive James Phillips's debut The Rubenstein Kiss. Since it won the John Whiting Award for...

CD: Shy FX - Raggamuffin SoundTape

Everything about this mixtape oozes confidence. It crams 12 tracks plus interludes – all produced by Andre “Shy FX” Williams ...

Schiff, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, RFH review –...

Standing next to the warm brown beast of a piano built by...

DVD/Blu-ray: Bergman - A Year in a Life

1957 was a busy year for a very busy director: ...

Richard II, Sam Wanamaker Theatre review - electrifying mixe...

Richard II has become the drama of our times, as it walks us through the impotent convulsions of a weak and vain leader brought down by in-...