fri 15/02/2019

Gavin Dixon

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Bio
Gavin Dixon is a writer, journalist and editor based in Hertfordshire, UK. He has a PhD on the symphonies of Alfred Schnittke and is a member of the editorial team for the Alfred Schnittke Collected Works Edition, currently being published in St Petersburg. Gavin is also a Curator of Musical Instruments at the Horniman Museum in London and Music Editor of Fanfare Magazine.

Articles By Gavin Dixon

Monteverdi Vespers, The Sixteen, Christophers, Cadogan Hall review – majesty on a modest scale

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Damrau, BRSO, Jansons, Barbican review - broad and passionate Strauss

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Ehnes, BBCSO, Ryan Wigglesworth, Barbican review - a concert of two very different halves

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LSO, Rattle, Barbican review - Bartók dances, Bruckner sings

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Thomas Adès, Wigmore Hall review - playful and erratic Janáček

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The Swingles, LPO, Jurowski, RFH review – austere Stravinsky, luminous Berio

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Mitsuko Uchida, Royal Festival Hall review - conviction and grace

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theartsdesk in Warsaw - Penderecki at 85

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The English Concert, Bicket, Wigmore Hall review – small-scale Bach

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Lawson, London Sinfonietta, Kings Place Review – diverse explorations of time

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Radamisto, English Touring Opera review - propulsive, lively Handel

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Das Rheingold, Royal Opera review - high drama and dark comedy

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Ian Bostridge, Thomas Adès, Wigmore Hall review - haunting, brutal Schubert

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Parsifal, Saffron Opera Group review - drama and focus

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Ax, Kavakos, Ma, Barbican review - all-star Brahms

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Prom 74, Theodora, Arcangelo, Cohen review - coherent and compelling Handel

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latest in today

Berberian Sound Studio, Donmar Warehouse review – improves t...

Two men called "Massimo" face the audience, one very tall, one very, well, minimo. The tall Massimo (Tom Espiner, pictured below...

The Kid Who Would Be King review - a timeless charmer

The Arthurian legend’s tight fit as a Brexit allegory perhaps proves how...

John Ruskin: The Power of Seeing, Two Temple Place review -...

The power of seeing was the bedrock of John Ruskin’s philosophy. In the bicentenary of his birth, a revelatory exhibition at Two Temple Place in...

DVD: Tides

Tides tells of fortysomething angst and camaraderie, though “tells” might be an exaggeration. In a concerted attempt to make a...

The American Clock, Old Vic review - Arthur Miller's mu...

This year’s unofficial Arthur Miller season – following The Price and ahead of All My Sons at the Old Vic and Death of a...

Sarah Chang, Ashley Wass, Cadogan Hall review – a virtuoso...

“My first recital in about a gazillion years in...

The Best Films Out Now

There are films to meet every taste in theartsdesk's guide to the best movies currently on release. In our considered opinion, any of the titles...

All About Eve, Noel Coward Theatre review - less a bumpy nig...

Women spend a lot of time gazing at themselves in the mirror in the Belgian auteur director Ivo van Hove's latest...

CD: Chaka Khan - Hello Happiness

Chaka Khan’s last album, 2007’s Funk This was billed as...