wed 15/08/2018

tv

The Woman in White, BBC One review - camp Victoriana

Katherine Waters

The BBC excels at a very particular kind of drama, namely one where production values overawe dramatic content. Its version of The Woman in White (BBC One) proves no exception. Our hero is Walter, a bemused sappy painter played by ex-Eastender Ben Hardy.

Read more...

Home From Home, BBC One review - Johnny Vegas as everyman hero

Veronica Lee

Home From Home, written by newcomers Chris Fewtrell and Simon Crowther, first saw life as a pilot in the BBC’s Landmark Sitcom Season in 2016, the channel's search for new and original content for its schedules. Well, new it may be, but original it ain’t – yet don’t let that put you off. It’s a decent enough run-through of several sitcom tropes, with Johnny Vegas as its everyman hero.

Read more...

True Horror, Channel 4 review - a Ronseal approach to ghost stories

Owen Richards

As if the real world wasn’t scary enough... Ghost stories are en vogue at the moment, and after the BBC’s hit-and-miss Requiem, Channel 4 brings True Horror to the small screen – a collection of "real" ghost stories, told by witness interviews and dramatised with a decent budget.

Read more...

Occupied, series 2, Sky Atlantic review - political conflicts looking all too actual

Mark Sanderson

Eight months have passed since the Russians invaded Norway in the first season of Jo Nesbo’s neo-Cold War thriller. Real-life events have only made Occupied seem more relevant.

Read more...

Stephen: The Murder That Changed A Nation, BBC One review - ‘He was a cool guy and everybody loved him’

Katherine Waters

When doctors told Doreen Lawrence her son had died she thought, "That’s not true." Spending time with his body in the hospital, aside from a cut on his cheek, it seemed to her he was sleeping. The death of a child will always be strange, and in the aftermath Neville, his father and her husband, even wondered if he might have been struck by the Biblical curse of the loss of his first-born.

Read more...

The Queen's Green Planet, ITV review - right royal arboreals

marina Vaizey

QCC isn’t the name of a new football club, nor some higher qualification for those toiling at the Bar, but stands for "Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy". Had you heard of it? On the eve of the Commonwealth conference, along came Jane Treays's gently hilarious, and finally rather tender film to fill in the gaps. 

Read more...

Lifeline, Channel 4 review - Spanish sci-fi drama on speed

Jasper Rees

It is with some trepidation that the globe-trotting viewer embarks on a new drama from Spain. Last year in BBC Four stole the best part of 20 hours of some lives with its split-series transmission of the maddening I Know Who You Are.

Read more...

Law and Order, BBC Four review - not a fair cop

Jasper Rees

In the late 1970s the British establishment sustained a bloody nose. Roland Huntford published his debunking of Captain Scott and Anthony Blunt was outed as the Fourth Man, while the Old Etonian Liberal party leader Jeremy Thorpe was tried for conspiracy to murder.

Read more...

Boy George and Culture Club: From Karma to Calamity, BBC Four

Barney Harsent

The title signalled what was coming so clearly, it may as well have been called When Bands End Badly: the two camps, the arguments and sniping and the eventual collapse of Culture Club’s US and UK tour to promote an album of new material. It’s hardly a surprise though – this is a band that, history shows, would have benefitted from the visible presence of an armed UN peacekeeping force.

Read more...

Below the Surface, Series Finale, BBC Four review - tense and twisty to the bitter end

Adam Sweeting

In the previous couple of episodes, some light began to seep into the subterranean gloom of the Copenhagen kidnappers, or at any rate onto their identities and motivations.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

On the Edge, Channel 4, review - fast and furious new dramas

Television drama is living through a golden age, yes, but...

Edinburgh Fringe 2018: Luisa Omielan/ Brennan Reece/ Olga Ko...

Luisa Omielan ★★★★

Luisa Omiela, a confirmed party girl, is the first to admit she used to...

The Best Plays in London

London is the theatre capital of the world, with more than 50 playhouses offering theatrical entertainment. From the mighty National Theatre to...

F Off: National Youth Theatre puts social media on trial

F Off came about off the back of a meeting I had with Paul Roseby, the artistic director of the National Youth Theatre of Great Britain....

DVD: Arcadia

Arcadia is the latest and the best of a series of films which draw on the archives of the...

Prom 42, Buniatishvili, Estonian Festival Orchestra, Järvi r...

Music-lovers who normally balk at the sight of national colours in a concert hall would surely have forgiven the little...

Greed as the keynote: Robert Carsen on the timelessness of...

In the time of composer John Gay, greed and self-interest were the main motives for life; and his work The Beggar’s Opera is an open...

Edinburgh Festival 2018 reviews: Nigel Slater's Toast /...

 

Nigel Slater's Toast ★★★★  

“It’s...