tue 14/08/2018

Visual Arts Interviews

theartsdesk Q&A: Photographer Mick Rock

Hilary Whitney Mick Rock: 'My allegiance was always to the act. I wasn't owned by a magazine or a record label.'

Mick Rock (b 1948) captured some of rock's most provocative and memorable images: David Bowie at the height of his Ziggy Stardust androgyny; Debbie Harry looking every inch the Marilyn Monroe of punk; Lou Reed sweating beneath his Kabuki make-up - indeed, The Faces of Rock'n'Roll, as a new book surveying four decades of his photographs is titled.

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Artist Mark Wallinger

Fisun Güner Mark Wallinger is fascinated by the idea of 'mirroring' and has recently ventured into unconventional self-portraiture

For his new show at Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London, Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger will be unveiling a first: a life-sized, three-dimensional "self-portrait". But it won't be a straightforward representation of the 50-year-old conceptual artist. It will, instead, be a representation of himself as the letter "I" in Times New Roman. His Vauxhall studio, in South London, is filled with pictures of "self-portraits" of the artist as a series of letters. It is also filled with the...

Read more...

Picasso Special - theartsdesk Q&A: John Richardson, Picasso's biographer

Jasper Rees

John Richardson (b. 1924) is nearing the end of his definitive four-tome life of the minuscule giant of Cubism. Of the various breaks he has taken from the business of research and writing, one yielded The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, a gossipy, elegant account of his own friendship with Picasso in the 1950s, when he lived in Provençal splendour with Douglas Cooper, then the owner of the finest collection of Cubist art in the world.

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Artist Maggi Hambling

Hilary Whitney Maggi Hambling: 'You’ve got to make your work your best friend'

Next week sees the opening of an exhibition at Marlborough Fine Art of new work by Maggi Hambling, one of the most innovative and prolific - not to mention flamboyant - artists working in Britain today, which neatly coincides with a show of sea paintings at the Fitzwilliam in Cambridge. You can see a selection in theartsdesk's gallery. Born in 1945,...

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips

Fisun Güner

Born in 1954, Adam Phillips is a leading psychoanalyst, literary critic and author. For 17 years he worked as a child psychotherapist in the NHS before moving into private practice to work with adults. As well as being a self-confessed "sceptical" psychoanalyst, he is also known as something of "the literati's analyst of choice". His many, often playfully titled books have included The Art of Kissing, Tickling and Being Bored: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Unexamined Life (1993);...

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Artist Douglas Gordon

Jasper Rees Douglas Gordon: Self-portrait as Kurt Cobain, as Andy Warhol, as Myra Hindley, as Marilyn Monroe, 1996

Since winning the Turner Prize in 1996 with Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Douglas Gordon (b. 1966) has lived in Germany, France, New York and Germany again. But in accent and attitude, he remains a Glaswegian. Those roots are being reaffirmed at the moment: as part of this year's Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art, one of Gordon's most celebrated works is back on display in the city where it was first shown.

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Artist Anish Kapoor

Fisun Güner

The sculptor Anish Kapoor (b. 1954), RA, CBE, won the Turner Prize in 1990. His public works are characterised by their gigantic scale and ambition. In the UK he is probably best known for Marsyas (2002), the viscerally red “ear trumpet” that elegantly spanned the entire length of the Turbine Hall in Tate Modern. He is also the artist behind the world’s most expensive public sculpture. Cloud Gate (picture below), completed in 2006, is a beguiling polished...

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Photographer Jillian Edelstein

sue Steward

Jillian Edelstein, the distinguished photographer, is joining theartsdesk. She grew up in Cape Town and in 1985 moved to London, where within a year she had won the Kodak UK Young Photographer of the Year award. It was to be the first of many such accolades.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Greed as the keynote: Robert Carsen on the timelessness of...

In the time of composer John Gay, greed and self-interest were the main motives for life; and his work The Beggar’s Opera is an open...

Edinburgh Festival 2018 reviews: Nigel Slater's Toast /...

 

Nigel Slater's Toast ★★★★  

“It’s...

CD: Oh Sees - Smote Reverser

Oh Sees have been perennial festival favourites for over 15 years now, releasing 21 albums under seven different band names. The change of name...

Prom 40, Academy of St Martin in the Fields, Bell review - t...

When did this weird mix-tape fashion take root at the Proms? Just...

theartsdesk at the Pärnu Music Festival 2018 - Pärt, Leonska...

Unanticipated miracles happen every summer in the quiet paradise of...

Edinburgh Festival 2018 reviews: Daughter / Huff / First Sno...

Launched just last year to celebrate the country’s 150th anniversary, ...

h 100 Awards: Broadcast - TV's national treasures

In the ever-expanding field of broadcast, it’s easy to get lost in the deluge of product raining down from swaggering global providers who...

CD: Slaves - Acts of Fear And Love

When Kentish hardcore punk two-piece, Slaves emerged with their...