mon 21/09/2020

Rambert, Cardoon Club/ Roses/ Monolith, Sadler’s Wells | reviews, news & interviews

Rambert, Cardoon Club/ Roses/ Monolith, Sadler’s Wells

Rambert, Cardoon Club/ Roses/ Monolith, Sadler’s Wells

One of Paul Taylor's greatest works, immaculately performed

Another of Paul Taylor's masterpieces: 'Roses', in rehearsalPhoto: Chris Taylor

Paul Taylor's Roses is called Roses because, well, because it is. There are no roses here, no flowery sentiment, no overwrought angst and emotion. This, one of Taylor’s most beautifully serene works, is the smell of roses on a still May evening: fleeting, evanescent and heart-breakingly beautiful. It is also some of the most magisterial - and startlingly original - choreography, even a quarter of a century after it was first made.

Paul Taylor's Roses is called Roses because, well, because it is. There are no roses here, no flowery sentiment, no overwrought angst and emotion. This, one of Taylor’s most beautifully serene works, is the smell of roses on a still May evening: fleeting, evanescent and heart-breakingly beautiful. It is also some of the most magisterial - and startlingly original - choreography, even a quarter of a century after it was first made.

One of Taylor’s most beautifully serene works: fleeting, evanescent and heart-breakingly beautiful

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