fri 29/04/2016

Alexandra Coghlan

alexandra.coghlan

Alexandra Coghlan's picture
Bio
Alexandra is the classical music critic of the New Statesman, and has written on arts for The Times, The Independent, The Guardian, Prospect, Gramophone, Opera Now, The Oxford Times and The Monthly. She was formerly Performing Arts Editor at Time Out, Sydney. She writes about classical music, theatre and film for theartsdesk.

Articles by Alexandra Coghlan

Brahms: A German Requiem, ENO Chorus, Wigglesworth, St George's Hanover Square

There aren’t many opera choruses I’d want to hear singing Brahms’ Requiem, and still fewer I’d rush to hear. But the Olivier Award-winning ENO chorus is a different beast altogether – as responsive...

Read more...

Lucia di Lammermoor, Royal Opera

Lucia di Lammermoor is an opera in which men spend an awful lot of time talking about women, and very little actually talking to them. (Which, if nothing else, ensures a rather more dramatic...

Read more...

Written on Skin, Barbican

You learn a lot about an opera in concert. Free from directorial and design intervention, the music can and must do it all. What is good is amplified, and what’s weak exposed. When that score is as...

Read more...

Ariodante, Britten Theatre, Royal College of Music

The London Handel Festival is back, and instead of ploughing their usual furrow of rarely-seen works, this year’s opera is a classic. If the rest of Ariodante doesn’t quite live up to the promise of...

Read more...

Akhnaten, English National Opera

What a load of balls. No, seriously. Globes, orbs, moons, suns, juggling balls, beach balls, er balls balls: if it’s spherical and pregnant with symbolism then you’re bound to find it somewhere on...

Read more...

Orlando, The English Concert, Bicket, Barbican

Anyone who says Handel can’t do psychology should spend an evening with Orlando. Form, orchestration, even exit conventions are all reinvented or cast aside for a work of startlingly contemporary...

Read more...

The Magic Flute, English National Opera

“We are at a time of present crisis.” When Sarastro addressed his boardroom of business-suited acolytes last night, there can’t have been many in the Coliseum whose thoughts didn’t turn to English...

Read more...

The Winter's Tale, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

For a play about silence – its uncanny ability to tell the truth, to “persuade when speaking fails” – The Winter’s Tale is remarkably wordy. Of the sequence of late romances only Cymbeline comes...

Read more...

Tosca, Royal Opera

To say this latest revival of the Royal Opera’s Tosca peaks early would be an understatement. The shockwaves rippling out from the brass and timpani in the first few bars set the auditorium rumbling...

Read more...

Pelléas et Mélisande, LSO, Rattle, Barbican

Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande is a drama played out in shadow. Shine too bright, too unyielding a directorial light on it, and the delicate dramatic fabric – all unspokens and unspeakables – frays...

Read more...

Scholl, Halperin, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

“Music for a while, shall all your cares beguile.” So promise Dryden and Purcell in their hypnotic song, a high-stakes closer for Andreas Scholl and Tamar Halperin’s "Exquisite Love" recital. But...

Read more...

Cymbeline, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

There’s a happy, cyclical logic to this first production of Cymbeline – Shakespeare’s late tragicomedy of love and jealousy – at the Globe’s Sam Wanamaker Playhouse. The first play Shakespeare wrote...

Read more...

Cavalleria Rusticana/Pagliacci, Royal Opera

You can forgive a certain amount of scepticism. After his now-infamous Royal Opera debut earlier this year, directing a Guillaume Tell that was heavy on concept and light on just about everything...

Read more...

Pericles, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

Pericles is a play of voyages. Lands and landscapes crowd in, one after the other – Tyre, Tarsus, Ephesus, Antioch, Mitylene –  until our dramatic sea-legs are decidedly unsteady. The demands...

Read more...

Castor et Pollux, St John's Smith Square

An evening of Rameau was never going to be a neutral event. Last Friday all things French became painfully, irretrievably politicised, and while there were no speeches or acknowledgements last night...

Read more...

L'Ospedale, Wilton's Music Hall

Anyone lamenting the current trend for “wellness” and other associated holistic, pseudo-medical fads might want to take themselves for a medicinal trip down to Wilton’s Music Hall for L’Ospedale....

Read more...

latest in today

Son of Saul

Dead man walking: Hungarian exploration of the closed universe of Auschwitz...

Il Vologeso, Classical Opera, Cadogan Hall

A gem from 1766 offers pure delight in perfect casting and playing

10 Questions for Musician Debashish Bhattacharya

The Indian raga slide guitar genius talks Hawaii, Brighton, punk rock and m...

Tharaud, CBSO, Volkov, Symphony Hall Birmingham

An instant classic from Hans Abrahamsen, and Mahler in inverted commas

Line of Duty, Series 3 Finale, BBC Two

Vicki McClure takes charge in pulsating showdown to round off gripping seri...

DVD: Tootsie

Dustin Hoffman dresses as a woman to become a better man in a lovingly craf...

theartsdesk on Vinyl: Volume 16 - Santana, Yeasayer and load...

From Emmylou Harris to German jazz to London techno, all the new vinyl acti...

John Piper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

Intimately connected to his paintings, the artist's textiles remain my...

Glennie, Ticciati, O/Modernt Kammarorkester, Kings Place

Percussion and strings, contemporary and Tchaikovsky, brilliantly interwove...

The Iliad, Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh

A fast-moving, thoughtful Homer adaptation marks Mark Thomson's last p...