thu 28/07/2016

Alexandra Coghlan

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Bio
Alexandra is the classical music critic of the New Statesman, and has written on arts for The Times, The Independent, The Guardian, Prospect, Gramophone, Opera Now, The Oxford Times and The Monthly. She was formerly Performing Arts Editor at Time Out, Sydney. She writes about classical music, theatre and film for theartsdesk.

Articles by Alexandra Coghlan

Prom 15: Chen, BBCSO, BBCSC, Davis

Programming a concert is a tricky business. Programming an entire Proms season almost unthinkably difficult. But even allowing for the odd evening of leftovers, those artists, anniversaries and...

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Jesus Christ Superstar, Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

London’s West End may be the envy of the world, but when it comes to musicals the big-hitting theatres might have to up their game a bit if they’re to keep up with the city’s rival offerings. Compare...

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The Brook Street Band, Wigmore Hall

Happy returns of various kinds last night at the Wigmore Hall, where hall regulars the Brook Street Band (violins Rachel Harris and Farran Scott, cellist Tatty Theo and harpsichordist Carolyn Gibley...

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The Creation, Garsington Opera

Once confined to the concert hall, it’s a rare oratorio these days that doesn’t duck under the fence and sneak into the opera house. Bach’s Passions and most of Handel’s religious works have already...

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Götterdämmerung, Opera North, Southbank Centre

And so it ends: Hagen drowns, Valhalla burns, and the ring returns to the Rhine, while somewhere beneath – Wagner’s dawn trumpets sounding faintly in the distance – the dwarf Alberich continues his...

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La Bohème, Opera Holland Park

Boy meets girl; girl and boy fall in love; boy loses girl. In true bohemian fashion, La bohème can lay its operatic head anywhere from Paris to Peshawar, in any era from 90s punk to the Belle Epoque...

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Matthias Goerne, Daniil Trifonov, Wigmore Hall

If you needed further proof of the intelligence, the thoughtfulness of Daniil Trifonov’s musicianship, the programme for his four-concert residency at the Wigmore Hall would go a long way towards...

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The Taming of the Shrew, Shakespeare's Globe

There’s a problem with The Taming of the Shrew, and it isn’t the one of Shakespeare’s making. So legendary are the work’s difficulties, so notorious its potential misogyny, that each new production...

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The Threepenny Opera, National Theatre

Last seen at the National Theatre over 10 years ago, Brecht and Weill’s The Threepenny Opera is back in a new adaptation by Simon Stephens. But looking at Rufus Norris’s epic-theatre-lite production...

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4.48 Psychosis, Royal Opera, Lyric Hammersmith

New operas are a risky business, or so the Royal Opera’s past experience teaches us. For years, visiting the company’s Linbury Studio Theatre was like rolling the dice while on a losing streak: vain...

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Love & Friendship

Jane Austen’s early novel-in-letters Lady Susan has more in common with Vanity Fair or even Les Liaisons Dangereuses than it does with the author’s mature works. Austen’s familiar wit is there,...

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Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, Glyndebourne

A celebration of the power of words and music (leaving aside, briefly, that more troubling business about the Fatherland), Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg is a natural opener for the summer...

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Madam Butterfly, English National Opera

There’s a beautiful moment at the start of Act II of Anthony Minghella’s Madam Butterfly. Butterfly kneels, leaning forward to kiss Pinkerton, seated in his defiantly Western armchair. A paper screen...

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The Dark Mirror: Zender's Winterreise, Barbican Theatre

Elasticity is a surprisingly reliable test for great art. How far can you stretch, bend, or reshape a work before it loses its essence, its identity?  Hamlet, The Well-Tempered Clavier, Antigone...

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Brighton Festival: The Encounter, Attenborough Centre for Creative Arts

Simon McBurney and Complicite have made plays about many things – maths, circuses, immigration, Japan, old age – but, at core, they’re all really about the same subject: storytelling. Their latest...

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The Busker's Opera, Park Theatre

Satire, we’re solemnly instructed in Dougal Irvine’s new musical The Busker's Opera, “has to strike a fine balance of entertainment and teaching”. Well yes, but it’s also generally wise (discretion,...

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latest in today

CD: Sonzeira – Tam Tam Tam Reimagined

Brilliant re-working of epochal 1950s album

The Plough and the Stars, National Theatre

Revival of Sean O’Casey’s modern classic is relevant, but a bit sombre

Half A Sixpence, Chichester Festival Theatre

The Tommy Steele musical gets a triumphant, banjo-rehabilitating refresh

Prom 15: Chen, BBCSO, BBCSC, Davis

Mixed-bag Prom yields strong young soloist but some weak choral singing

Detroit: Techno City, Institute of Contemporary Arts

A tiny glimpse of history kicks off a huge party

10 Questions for Musician Jasper Høiby

The Danish bassist on the perils of consumerism, playing without the dots,...

Jason Bourne

Bourne to run (and run and run)

CD: Old Fire - Songs from the Haunted South

The Earlies' John Mark Lapham produces a stunning album 10 years in th...

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Palace Theatre

Does the continuing story of JK Rowling's witches and wizards work its...

Don Quixote, Bolshoi Ballet, Royal Opera House

The Russians are back, marking 60 years since they first took London by sto...