mon 21/04/2014

Alexandra Coghlan

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Bio
Alexandra is the classical music critic of the New Statesman, and has written on arts for The Times, The Independent, The Guardian, Prospect, Gramophone, Opera Now, The Oxford Times and The Monthly. She was formerly Performing Arts Editor at Time Out, Sydney. She writes about classical music, theatre and film for theartsdesk.

Articles by Alexandra Coghlan

Relative Values, Harold Pinter Theatre

Plotted on the Nunn Curve of Fatal Attraction to Flare Path, Sir Trevor’s latest West End outing – Noël Coward’s post-war comedy Relative Values – lands solidly in the upper-middle reaches. Why not...

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Powder Her Face, English National Opera, Ambika P3

The opening gyrations of Thomas Adès’s bluesy, schmoozy overture to Powder Her Face beckon you into a world of cheap sensation and excess. Accordion, saxophones and sizzle cymbal add their indecent,...

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theartsdesk in Sydney: Beyond the Cringe

I hadn’t heard the term “cultural cringe” until I went to live in Australia. Holiday encounters had been so full of sunshine, art, water and music that it hadn’t occurred to me to doubt the cultural...

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L'Arpeggiata, Wigmore Hall

Turning every concert into a party, baroque ensemble L’Arpeggiata are performers in the truest sense. Too often early musicians get away with being shy or downright awkward, visibly uncomfortable...

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Rigoletto, English National Opera

Old sins, the saying goes, cast long shadows. These are nothing, however, to the shadows cast by old productions. Jonathan Miller’s Mafia Rigoletto looms larger than most in this regard – a lowering...

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Theodora, The English Concert, Bicket, Barbican Hall

The Barbican’s ongoing season of baroque operas and oratorios has been a mixed bag.  Most recently The Sixteen’s Jephtha was a rather lacklustre affair, leaving me nervous of committing to the...

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The Duchess of Malfi, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

A candlelit theatre is one thing. A theatre when those candles are so close you could lean in and blow them out, where a good line sets them flickering in gusts of audience laughter is quite another...

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Jephtha, The Sixteen, Christophers, Barbican

You really think they’d have learned by now. Any operatic vow to sacrifice the next living creature you see in return for salvation will reliably end up with the luckless suppliant faced with their...

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Kožená, Les Violons du Roy, Barbican Hall

Last night’s Mozart and Haydn concert at the Barbican was billed as Magdalena Kožená with Les Violons du Roy. In practice it actually turned out to be Les Violons du Roy with Magdalena Kožená, which...

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Stephen Ward, Aldwych Theatre

Unlikely subjects can make for great musicals. (Assassins, anyone?). Just as great subjects can make for terrible ones (the Broadway Breakfast at Tiffany’s comes to mind). Sadly Andrew Lloyd Webber’s...

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The Anatomy of Melancholy, Ovalhouse

The Anatomy of Melancholy (or to give it its full title - The Anatomy of Melancholy, What it is: With all the Kinds, Causes, Symptomes, Prognostickes, and Several Cures of it. In Three Maine...

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Stile Antico, Cadogan Hall

Earlier this year early music ensemble Stile Antico released a really fabulous disc. The Phoenix Rising is a collage of the Tudor church-music classics that all gained their status and familiarity...

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Schools' Prom, Royal Albert Hall

This year I’ve sat through Carrie Cracknell’s Wozzeck dry-eyed, seen a handful of Mimis take their last consumptive breath without so much as a tremor, even heard Shostakovich’s shattering Symphony...

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Jerusalem Quartet, Elisabeth Leonskaja, Wigmore Hall

A previous visit to the Wigmore Hall saw the Jerusalem Quartet make headlines for all the wrong reasons, after political protestors disrupted the live-broadcast concert. Last night however all was...

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Satyagraha Remix: Opera Reaches Out

The brightly coloured flyer promises all manner of activities. Improvised jam sessions, performance poetry, and philosophy discussions. Oh, and an Indian dance workshop. On an obscenely cold Sunday...

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Middlemarch: Dorothea's Story, Orange Tree Theatre

Adapt a Jane Austen novel for the stage and you have a generous handful of characters and a selection of drawing rooms in which to put them. Adapt a George Eliot novel and you’re faced with a whole...

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