fri 15/11/2019

CD: Little Mix - DNA | reviews, news & interviews

CD: Little Mix - DNA

CD: Little Mix - DNA

Can a group with its own personality survive an X Factor win?

DNA: by committee

Well that's a shame. Little Mix were likable, talented winners of The X Factor – four times Everygirl in clashing neon, funky, funny, vulnerable but self aware. They proved repeatedly on the show that they could sing and then some, and even though they were a thrown-together group harmonised like they were sisters. Their most memorable turn, doing En Vogue's “Don't Let Go”, perfectly caught the beginning of the current wave of nostalgia for the great 1990s R&B girl groups, and when they won it felt like they could be an actual characterful pop band in the way the Sugababes and Girls Aloud were and, say, The Saturdays could never quite be.

Their first single proper, after the standard winners' Christmas number one, was/is great too – but rather ominously, “Wings” kicks this album off, as if to shout out that they don't have anything else as attention-grabbing. And they don't. There are some good bits, and some small attempts to keep the rough human edges that made LM so charming as they ascended The X Factor greasy pole, but really it's mostly a hodgepodge of committee design, migraine production and the kind of worthy whineyness we'll never escape post Emeli Sandé.

The 90s R&B references are ladled on – a De La Soul psuedo-cover in "How Ya' Doin", a guest spot from TLC's T Boz on the admittedly crunchy "Red Planet" – but really it's shrill, autotunemungous 2010s mall-pop through and through, with obligatory crashing dubstep flourishes and all the character produced and focus-grouped to within an inch of its life, then focus-grouped some more. A lost opportunity.

It felt like they could be an actual characterful pop band in the way the Sugababes and Girls Aloud were

rating

Editor Rating: 
2
Average: 2 (1 vote)

Share this article

Add comment

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

newsletter

Get a weekly digest of our critical highlights in your inbox each Thursday!

Simply enter your email address in the box below

View previous newsletters

Advertising feature

★★★★★

A compulsive, involving, emotionally stirring evening – theatre’s answer to a page-turner.
The Observer, Kate Kellaway

 

Direct from a sold-out season at Kiln Theatre the five star, hit play, The Son, is now playing at the Duke of York’s Theatre for a strictly limited season.

 

★★★★★

This final part of Florian Zeller’s trilogy is the most powerful of all.
The Times, Ann Treneman

 

Written by the internationally acclaimed Florian Zeller (The Father, The Mother), lauded by The Guardian as ‘the most exciting playwright of our time’, The Son is directed by the award-winning Michael Longhurst.

 

Book by 30 September and get tickets from £15*
with no booking fee.