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The God of Soho, Shakespeare's Globe | reviews, news & interviews

The God of Soho, Shakespeare's Globe

The God of Soho, Shakespeare's Globe

Fun loses out to facetiousness in premiere of Chris Hannan's new play

In God we trust (or not): Phil Daniels plays The Big God opposite Miranda Foster as the MissusSimon Kane

It's grin and bear it - even on occasion bare it - time at Shakespeare's Globe, which closes its 2011 season not with a bang but with a wearyingly facetious whimper. A nice idea that in differing ways evokes such previous Globe newbies as Helen and The Frontline while paying homage to the Bard's own penchant for many and varied couplings, Chris Hannan's latest aims for a giddy, carnival atmosphere that it only fitfully achieves. As for its apparent obsession with scatology, Hannan at least allows for conversational variety where least expected: "I'm shitness," our heroine Natty (Emma Pierson) remarks late in Act I. There's a linguistic first, at least to me.

It's grin and bear it - even on occasion bare it - time at Shakespeare's Globe, which closes its 2011 season not with a bang but with a wearyingly facetious whimper. A nice idea that in differing ways evokes such previous Globe newbies as Helen and The Frontline while paying homage to the Bard's own penchant for many and varied couplings, Chris Hannan's latest aims for a giddy, carnival atmosphere that it only fitfully achieves. As for its apparent obsession with scatology, Hannan at least allows for conversational variety where least expected: "I'm shitness," our heroine Natty (Emma Pierson) remarks late in Act I. There's a linguistic first, at least to me.

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Matt Wolf is not living the life I am. He totally fails to relate the God of Soho to the real society it is addressing. Yet another example of prviliged individuals commenting on a society they are completely divorced from. This phenomena is usually a result of ageing. Understand that the God of Soho represents what adults caring for young people in challenging experiences encounter. This play represents an opportunity to watch and learn.

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