thu 26/05/2022

New releases on CD & DVD

Album: Def Leppard - Diamond Star Halos

Joe Muggs

This album starts and ends so brilliantly. It kicks off with a salvo of three tracks that remind you exactly why Def Leppard became one of the biggest bands in the world in the mid Eighties.

Album: Liam Gallagher - C'Mon You Know

Thomas H Green

While Britpop was a retrogressive media construct, Oasis were a genuine socio-musical phenomenon (albeit also retrogressive!). And at their heart was, of course, Liam Gallagher, bullishly Manc, sneeringly rude and pugnaciously charismatic, a proper rock star, perhaps the last before the oncoming generation of coffee-drinking, fleece-wearing nice-boys-next-door.

DVD/Blu-ray: Parallel Mothers

Graham Rickson

Parallel Mothers unfolds at a daringly slow pace, and there are moments in the first half of Pedro Almodóvar’s 2021 drama when you wish that things...

Album: Heidi Talbot - Sing it for a Lifetime

Tim Cumming

As break-up albums go, Heidi Talbot’s new set knocks that tightly wound ball of heartbreak, separation and release into the front rank, on an arc of...

Album: Harry Styles - Harry's House

Thomas H Green

Harry Styles’ previous two albums sounded like someone rifling pleasantly through the history of pop and rock, but always genially and politely. More...

Album: Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - Dirt Does Dylan

Liz Thomson

Dirt dusts down Dylan

Blu-ray: I Am a Camera

Graham Fuller

Toothless British adaptation of Christopher Isherwood's Berlin stories

Album: Lykke Li - EYEYE

Harry Thorfinn-George

Lykke Li's shortest album is her most expansive yet

Album: Everything Everything - Raw Data Feel

Tom Carr

Manchester indie art-rockers experiment successfully with musical AI

Album: Mavis Staples and Levon Helm - Carry Me Home

Mark Kidel

Good enough gospel but a little too bland

Blu-ray: Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer

Nick Hasted

Viscerally uncomfortable genre landmark shows a mundane murderer's daily rounds

Album: Kendrick Lamar - Mr Morale & the Big Steppers

Joe Muggs

The philosopher-king of hip hop culture ventures ever inwards: but will he become too dour?

Album: Dubstar - Two

Thomas H Green

1990s pop duo return with a lush exercise in likeable, wistful melancholy

Album: Van Morrison - What's It Gonna Take?

Nick Hasted

Pernicious lockdown conspiracies, leavened by depressed confessions

Album: Florence + the Machine - Dance Fever

Guy Oddy

Lockdown brings out the pop-progger in Florence Welch

Blu-ray: Round Midnight

Sebastian Scotney

The greatest movie about jazz ever? Bertrand Tavernier's collaboration with Dexter Gordon makes its case

Album: The Waterboys - All Souls Hill

Joe Muggs

Mike Scott's ever-evolving troubadours attempt modernisation with mixed success

Album: Emeli Sandé - Let's Say For Instance

Thomas H Green

The popular singer moves further into commonplace mainstream fare

Album: Congotronics International - Where’s The One?

Howard Male

Cultural sharing of the most life-affirming and necessary kind

Album: Arcade Fire -WE

Tom Carr

Canadian indie rock giant's lockdown album is heartfelt and imaginative

Album: Kate Rusby - 30: Happy Returns

Liz Thomson

A bloodless album but it will appeal to the fans

Blu-ray: Escape from LA

Saskia Baron

John Carpenter's overblown sequel to his cult classic gets a sparkling re-release

Album: Soft Cell - Happiness Not Included

Kathryn Reilly

Soft Cell have clearly been having as rubbish a time as the rest of us

Album: Warpaint - Radiate Like This

Barney Harsent

The LA four-piece return with a carefully crafted and beautifully considered collection

Album: Willie Nelson - A Beautiful Time

Liz Thomson

A birthday offering from the old outlaw

Album: Ches Smith - Interpret It Well

Sebastian Scotney

Fine musicians who can make free improv sound as natural as breathing

Blu-ray: Jules et Jim

Mark Kidel

Jeanne Moreau at her most sublime in Truffaut's 1962 masterpiece

Album: Trombone Shorty – Lifted

Guy Oddy

Relentlessly upbeat first album in five years from US sideman

Album: Fontaines DC – Skinty Fia

Graham Fuller

Don't look for catharsis in the Irish band's tormented third album

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