mon 23/09/2019

DVD: Ted | reviews, news & interviews

DVD: Ted

DVD: Ted

Mark Wahlberg stars in a shining example of stupid comedy made smart

John (Mark Wahlberg) with Ted: a horrible guy but a good friend

What if your childhood teddy bear came to life and never went away? This unlikely premise (explained by Patrick Stewart no less) establishes the opening moments of one of the most unlikely breakout comedies of 2012. Ted, starring Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis and Seth (Family Guy) MacFarlane as the voice of Ted himself, is a brilliant shining example of stupid comedy made smart.

As a child, John Bennett (Wahlberg) was never popular. He was so unwelcome that even the victims of bullies told him to go away while they were being beaten up. But Bennett's dream of a life long buddy becomes a reality when a childhood teddy comes to life after a miraculous wish. At first, the talking teddy frightens his parents, but, logically, he becomes famous then a has been, leaving John and Ted to idle their lives away, farting and seeking the ideal blend of marijuana. Kunis is Lori, the wonderful woman with whom Bennett and Ted spend their lives. After four years of dating Bennett, there is talk she wants the bear out of their lives and for John to grow up. But Ted and he share so many interests - the love of Flash Gordon starring Sam Jones for one - that it is almost impossible for John and Ted to live apart. And yet they try.

That this story is incredibly believable, given its fairytale premise, is testimony to MacFarlane's almost religious dedication to slacker pothead humour. (MacFarlane also co-wrote and directed the film, which explains its comedic consistency.) Ted seduces women (I won't go into the alluded to details here), hires prostitutes and acts like a normal loser - but a charming normal loser with fluffy polyester fur and button eyes. Ted is a horrible guy, but also a good friend - and he's a teddy bear, so the audience is both attracted and repulsed.

As a piece of entertainment, Ted is a tiny bit of comedic genius, with dialogue so wonderfully imaginative and yet also realistic that you'll hate yourself for laughing, but laugh you will.

John and Ted idle their lives away, farting and seeking the ideal blend of marijuana

rating

Editor Rating: 
4
Average: 4 (1 vote)

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