mon 26/09/2016

Judith Flanders

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Bio
Judith is the author of A Circle of Sisters, a biography of Alice Kipling, Louisa Baldwin, Agnes Poynter and Georgiana Burne-Jones, The Victorian House: Domestic Life from Childbirth to Deathbed, and Consuming Passions: Leisure and Pleasure in Victorian England. Her new book, The Invention of Murder, was recently published in paperback. She writes on the arts and books for the Spectator, the Wall Street Journal, the Sunday Telegraph and the TLS.

Articles by Judith Flanders

Serenade/Carmina Burana, Birmingham Royal Ballet, London Coliseum

Serenade seems to be one of George Balanchine’s most evanescent works, a floating, delicate skein of movement that is over almost before it begins, leaving nothing but memory behind. In reality, it...

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Le Corsaire, English National Ballet

How silly is ballet allowed to be? It is a question that is not, well, as silly as it looks. English National Ballet’s director, Tamara Rojo, has set out her stall with a glitzy production of this...

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Jewels, Royal Ballet

It has been said that Mozart, so prodigiously talented so young, seemed to be merely a vessel through which God, or the music of the spheres, or whichever higher being one chooses, channelled the...

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Hofesh Shechter, Sun, Sadler’s Wells

The first time you see a Shechter piece, you feel it, literally as well as figuratively: percussive is a mild word for his forceful choreography, the stamping, churning, yearning of his sweeping...

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The Sleeping Beauty, Birmingham Royal Ballet, Sadler’s Wells

Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good. Sometimes, of course, it’s even better to be both. And Birmingham Royal Ballet, in their all-too-brief London season, have been both lucky and good. Lucky...

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Bintley Triple Bill, Birmingham Royal Ballet, Sadler’s Wells

Is David Bintley the one that got away, the wrong turning the Royal Ballet took in the early 1990s? I have long thought so, and watching their current triple bill, the feeling only grows. Bintley...

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Don Quixote, Royal Ballet

The opening night of the autumn season brings a gala first night, Carlos Acosta’s staging of Petipa’s Hispano-Russo-Austro-Hungarische castanet-fest, Don Quixote, with starry leads (Marianela Nuñez...

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Jewels, Bolshoi Ballet, Royal Opera House

The Bolshoi’s summer season in London has so far been straight-down-the-line trad: Swan Lake as an opener, Bayadère, Sleeping Beauty. Now, however, with Balanchine’s Jewels, they’ve at least dipped a...

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Mayerling, Royal Ballet

My great-grandmother used to say, "In the fall, leaves fall," meaning that as the weather gets colder, people die. The Royal Ballet has had leaves falling all year, and in the height of the (ha!)...

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Laurencia, Mikhailovsky Ballet, London Coliseum

It’s not often you go to a ballet to watch a history lesson unfold, but Laurencia, the 1939 Soviet ballet choreographed by Vakhtang Chabukiani, gives us exactly that, and a gripping one under the...

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Don Quixote, Mikhailovsky Ballet, London Coliseum

If you want virtuosity, there’s only one place to be in London right now, and that’s watching the Mikhailovsky’s fine production of that demented old warhorse, Don Quixote, with Natalia Osipova and...

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Giselle, Mikhailovsky Ballet, London Coliseum

When the Bolshoi’s wunderkinder, Natalia Osipova and Ivan Vasiliev, suddenly left the company two years ago, the dance world played endless guessing-games as to where they would end up. It was like...

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The Metamorphosis, Linbury Studio Theatre, Royal Opera House

“As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from a troubled dream, he found himself transformed in his bed into a monstrous insect.” In one of the most famous opening lines in literature, Franz Kafka gives...

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Vollmond, Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch, Sadler’s Wells

If you are a Bausch newbie, Vollmond (Full Moon) may well be the place to start. “It’s a full moon,” says Nazareth Panadero, giving us a cynical smirk. “Don’t get drunk,” she adds before sauntering...

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La Valse/ Monotones/ Marguerite & Armand, Royal Ballet

Genius does not mean having no influences. Monotones, one of the very greatest of Frederick Ashton's ballets, is heavily influenced by other works: by George Balanchine’s Theme and Variations and...

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Onegin, Royal Ballet

The worldwide success of John Cranko’s 1960s version of Tchaikovsky’s opera, in turn an adaptation of Pushkin’s verse-drama, might have taken even the choreographer by surprise. Tchaikovsky himself...

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How to contact Judith Flanders

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