fri 06/05/2016

Fisun Güner

fisun.guner

Fisun Güner's picture
Bio
Fisun is an art critic and writer and is the visual arts editor of theartsdesk. Her art writing has appeared in a range of publications, including The Spectator's Culture House blog, The Independent, Metro, The Evening Standard, New Statesman and Standpoint. You can follow her on Twitter @FisunGuner

Articles by Fisun Güner

Alexander Calder, Tate Modern

Sculpture that moves with the gentlest current of air! Sculpture that makes you want to do a little tap dance of joy! Or maybe the Charleston – swing a leg to those sizzling Jazz Age colours and...

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In Sol LeWitt's head is a machine that makes art

Any exhibition of Sol LeWitt’s work raises an interesting question. Why go and see it if it’s the idea that’s the most important aspect of the work? In his 1967 essay, “Paragraphs on Conceptual Art...

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American Horror Story: Hotel, Season 5, FX

A haunted house, a mental asylum, a witch’s coven, a circus freak show. Check, check, check. And check. Is there no horror trope left unturned in American Horror Story? Nope. And that’s precisely the...

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Goya: The Portraits, National Gallery

The brute nature of man in times of war, religious persecution and hypocrisy, and the destructive power of superstition. Francisco de Goya’s fame today largely rests on such themes, and they go a...

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Turner Prize 2015, Tramway, Glasgow

What’s going on? It seems the Turner Prize judges not only ran out of Scots to nominate this year, but actual artists. The socially enterprising architect-design collective Assemble don’t even call...

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Ai Weiwei, Royal Academy

Ai Weiwei’s first major survey in the UK is a better looking exhibition than I had anticipated, but what it gains in looks it sadly lacks in substance – backstory and information not being quite the...

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Drawing in Silver and Gold: Leonardo to Jasper Johns, British Museum

Unlike Venice, where colour reigned supreme among artists such as Titian and Veronese, Florence was the city where drawing – disegno – was held up as the cornerstone of the artist’s education. Think...

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An Open Book: Chantal Joffe

Huge canvases, bold, expressive brushwork and a full-bodied, vibrant palette. Chantal Joffe’s figurative paintings are certainly striking and seductive. Citing American painter Alice Neel and...

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An Open Book: Quentin Blake

Quentin Blake, illustrator, cartoonist and children’s author, has, to date, illustrated over 300 books. He is most famously associated with Roald Dahl, but he’s worked with a number of children’s...

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theartsdesk in Oslo: From heritage to art now

Things you might know about Oslo: it’s expensive and the cost of a beer, wine, dinner for two – whatever your tourist yardstick – might make your hair stand on end (the cost of living is currently...

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Joseph Cornell: Wanderlust, Royal Academy

Whimsical, twee, sentimental. For those who love Joseph Cornell’s boxes, it’s hard to imagine that there are those who just don’t. “What? You mean you don’t like Cornell’s boxes because you think...

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Imagine... Jeff Koons: Diary of a Seducer, BBC One

Feelings. Whoa whoa whoa feeeelings. Just like that Morris Albert hit of the Seventies for star-crossed lovers everywhere, I lost count of the number of times I heard that word in this Alan Yentob...

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Philip Guston, Timothy Taylor Gallery

Light. Light banishes the shadows where monsters lurk and where ghosts rattle their chains. “Give me some light, away!” cries the usurping king in Hamlet as his murderous deed is exposed by the...

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Grayson Perry: Provincial Punk, Turner Contemporary

Imagine if broadcasters thought the only living pop star worth giving air time to was Lady Gaga. Imagine – the horror. It would be wall-to-wall Gaga for the foreseeable future. And then imagine if...

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Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, BBC One

If it’s about magic, and features sanitised cobbled streets and dark gothic interiors, then Harry Potter comparisons will no doubt be inevitable.And so it has been with this seven-part adaptation of...

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Death of a Salesman, Noël Coward Theatre

We’ve not been short of memorable London productions of Arthur Miller’s best known works. Ivo van Hove’s triple Olivier award-winning A View from the Bridge, which transferred to the Wyndham’s...

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A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare's Globe

New artistic director Emma Rice makes a joyfully irreverent start

DVD: Room

Brie Larson won an Oscar, but there's more to this adaptation to Emma...

Thicker than Water, Series Finale, More4

Scandi-style midsummer murders sets us up for series two

Peaky Blinders, Series 3, BBC Two

Further down the road to perdition with Tommy Shelby and family

Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil, Barbican

A joint concert of two of Brazil's great singers impresses a rapt audi...

I Saw the Light

Darkness risible: Tom Hiddleston stars as Hank Williams in lacklustre biopi...

Frankenstein, Royal Ballet

New ballet has lavish production values, but the story's stretched thi...

An Enemy of the People, Chichester Festival Theatre

Hugh Bonneville returns to the stage after more than a decade in Ibsen...

Chris Cornell / Fantastic Negrito, Royal Albert Hall

Unusually potent programme pairs smooth romance and political protest

Who was St Clair Bayfield?

Florence Foster Jenkins's biographer tells the true story of her commo...