sat 20/09/2014

Fisun Güner

fisun.guner

Fisun Güner's picture
Bio
Fisun is an art critic and writer and is the visual arts editor of theartsdesk. Her art writing has appeared in a range of publications, including The Spectator's Culture House blog, The Independent, Metro, The Evening Standard, New Statesman and Standpoint. You can follow her on Twitter @FisunGuner

Articles by Fisun Güner

Jasper Johns: Regrets, Courtauld Gallery

In your ninth decade it may not come as a surprise to find death staring you in the face. But it might be unnerving if you’re an artist and a menacing “death's head” skull emerges, quite unexpectedly...

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Late Turner: Painting Set Free, Tate Britain

There is early Turner; there is late Turner. Early Turner is very much of his time: a history and landscape painter in the first half of the 19th century, looking back to the classicism of Claude and...

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Art Garfunkel, Royal Festival Hall

The voice no longer soars with easeful power, nor does it possess that tingling, honey-coated purity that gave hits such as “Bridge Over Troubled Water” such emotional force. This should hardly come...

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Joan Rivers, 1933-2014

Age could not wither her, or so it appeared. Joan Rivers has died, aged 81. On her 80th birthday she told an interviewer she’d be celebrating with her eightieth face. Her caustic humour could leave...

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Time, Weather, Place: Folkestone Triennial 2014

The crusty old Scottish artist Ian Hamilton Finlay died in 2006, but there’s a new art work by him at this year’s Folkestone Triennial. You won’t be able to see it with the naked eye, but you can...

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Bright Lights, Brilliant Minds: A Tale of Three Cities, BBC Four

Eight seconds in and my toes were already curling. Perhaps it was the authority with which the voiceover delivered some juicy clunkers. “If you wanted to be an artist in 1908, Vienna is where you’d...

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Opinion: The Tricycle were right over the UK Jewish Film Festival

Imagine an industrial disaster that manages to kill, maim or make homeless a significant percentage of the population of a densely populated city. Then imagine the effects of that disaster for years...

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Melvyn Bragg's Radical Lives, BBC Two

We’ve had only two poll tax riots in England. And since England has only twice legislated for a tax on the person, this proves rather a decisive verdict on its popularity. The last lot was in 1991,...

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Malevich, Tate Modern

The year 1915 was a big one for Kazimir Malevich, as it was for the course of modern art. It was the year the Black Square was first exhibited (June 1915 is the likeliest date of the painting’s...

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Mondrian, Turner Contemporary/ Tate Liverpool

It’s 70 years since Mondrian died in New York, leaving unfinished his last painting, Victory Boogie-Woogie, an ebullient title quite at odds with the buttoned-up asceticism we normally associate with...

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Gallery: International Exchanges, Tate St Ives

This summer, Tate St Ives turned 21. And this makes it as good a time as any for an exhibition repositioning the artists who were associated with St Ives, the small harbour town in Cornwall, where...

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Rebels of Oz: Germaine, Clive, Barry and Bob, BBC Four

They came, they saw, they conquered. It was the Sixties and London swung, while the suburbs of Melbourne and Sydney dozed in a beery torpor. Clive James recalls the fizz of beer pumps as the dreary...

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Arena: The 50 Year Argument, BBC Four

Well, I’ll be damned if subscriptions don’t shoot up this summer. This lovingly made paean to the New York Review of Books, directed by Martin Scorsese and his long-time documentary collaborator...

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Bridget Riley: The Stripe Paintings, David Zwirner

Bridget Riley’s mural for St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, which was unveiled in April this year, is something I’ve seen only in photographs. And on seeing it for the first time my reaction, I’m...

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The Human Factor, Hayward Gallery

When a large and ambitious group exhibition is mounted on a particular theme or subject, in this case the human figure in contemporary sculpture, it’s always interesting to note what gets left out as...

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Marina Abramović: 512 Hours, Serpentine Gallery

I’ll admit, there's a scene that made me well up during the excellent Marina Abramović biopic The Artist is Present. If you've seen it you’ll know the scene I mean – it’s where Ulay, Abramović’s...

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