sat 25/10/2014

Fisun Güner

fisun.guner

Fisun Güner's picture
Bio
Fisun is an art critic and writer and is the visual arts editor of theartsdesk. Her art writing has appeared in a range of publications, including The Spectator's Culture House blog, The Independent, Metro, The Evening Standard, New Statesman and Standpoint. You can follow her on Twitter @FisunGuner

Articles by Fisun Güner

Pierre Huyghe/ Paul McCarthy, Hauser & Wirth

In a tavern somewhere in Tokyo, two Japanese macaque monkeys work a daily, two-hour shift (under Japanese law, these hours are regulated). Dressed in miniature uniforms, the monkeys’ main task is to...

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The Knick, Sky Atlantic

That there is something of the Sherlock Holmes about Dr John Thackery – the Shakespeare-quoting, opium and cocaine-addicted surgeon in this Steve Soderbergh-directed 10-part drama set in a New York...

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Rembrandt: The Late Works, National Gallery

All human life, as they say, is here: we witness displays of warmth and tenderness in virtuous matrimony; reflection and contemplation in quiet solitude. We respond to the soft seductions of the...

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Anselm Kiefer, Royal Academy

And so, I finally come to write of Anselm Kiefer, and with something of a heavy heart, as heavy, I’d vouch, as one of his load-bearing canvases. In 2007, I was left breathless by the German...

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Turner Prize 2014, Tate Britain

When did Big Ideas make a comeback at the Turner Prize? Did they ever go away? In its 30-year history it seems that everything that wasn’t painting has been labelled “conceptual art”. But we know...

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Kylie, iTunes Festival, Roundhouse

Does Kylie exist without spectacle? Take away the 6ft headgear, the sparkly hotpants, the spangly corsets, the team of super-fit dancers dressed like futuristic liquorice allsorts, and what’s left?...

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Was it right to censor Exhibit B?

So, Exhibit B, the controversial “human zoo” using black actors to re-enact the role of ethnographic exhibits – semi-naked, chained, silenced by metal masks and degraded in metal collars ­– has been...

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Jasper Johns: Regrets, Courtauld Gallery

In your ninth decade it may not come as a surprise to find death staring you in the face. But it might be unnerving if you’re an artist and a menacing “death's head” skull emerges, quite unexpectedly...

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Late Turner: Painting Set Free, Tate Britain

There is early Turner; there is late Turner. Early Turner is very much of his time: a history and landscape painter in the first half of the 19th century, looking back to the classicism of Claude and...

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Art Garfunkel, Royal Festival Hall

The voice no longer soars with easeful power, nor does it possess that tingling, honey-coated purity that gave hits such as “Bridge Over Troubled Water” such emotional force. This should hardly come...

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Joan Rivers, 1933-2014

Age could not wither her, or so it appeared. Joan Rivers has died, aged 81. On her 80th birthday she told an interviewer she’d be celebrating with her eightieth face. Her caustic humour could leave...

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Time, Weather, Place: Folkestone Triennial 2014

The crusty old Scottish artist Ian Hamilton Finlay died in 2006, but there’s a new art work by him at this year’s Folkestone Triennial. You won’t be able to see it with the naked eye, but you can...

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Bright Lights, Brilliant Minds: A Tale of Three Cities, BBC Four

Eight seconds in and my toes were already curling. Perhaps it was the authority with which the voiceover delivered some juicy clunkers. “If you wanted to be an artist in 1908, Vienna is where you’d...

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Opinion: The Tricycle were right over the UK Jewish Film Festival

Imagine an industrial disaster that manages to kill, maim or make homeless a significant percentage of the population of a densely populated city. Then imagine the effects of that disaster for years...

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Melvyn Bragg's Radical Lives, BBC Two

We’ve had only two poll tax riots in England. And since England has only twice legislated for a tax on the person, this proves rather a decisive verdict on its popularity. The last lot was in 1991,...

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Malevich, Tate Modern

The year 1915 was a big one for Kazimir Malevich, as it was for the course of modern art. It was the year the Black Square was first exhibited (June 1915 is the likeliest date of the painting’s...

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