wed 25/01/2017

Competition

Win a pair of tickets to see Port

The playwright Simon Stephens had a remarkable 2012. His version of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House for the Young Vic was widely acclaimed, while his adaptation of Mark Haddon’s much-loved bestseller The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time did well enough to earn a forthcoming transfer to the West End. It doesn’t stop in 2013. This month the National is reviving Port, an early play by Stephens. We are offering a pair of tickets to see it. All you need to do is answer the following three questions before the deadline of midnight on 20 January. Hint hint: you’ll find the information you need in theartsdesk Q&A with Stephens published last summer.

22 January – 24 March - Over 230 £12 Tickets for every performanceFor more information and to book tickets please visit nationaltheatre.org.uk/port

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