wed 08/07/2020

Album: Enter Shikari - Nothing Is True & Everything Is Possible | reviews, news & interviews

Album: Enter Shikari - Nothing Is True & Everything Is Possible

Album: Enter Shikari - Nothing Is True & Everything Is Possible

Hertfordshire crew finally run out of road with their sixth album

Enter Shikari: Nothing is true, nor is it very entertaining

In the press release for Enter Shikari’s new album, lead singer Rou Reynolds is proclaimed as a “visionary”. However, for the work of a visionary, Nothing is True and Everything is Possible is a decidedly pedestrian effort. Filled with bluster and bombast, the lyrics betray a shocking amount of cheesey and cliched teenage angst for the work of a group of thirty-somethings and it's backed by music that steals from all quarters without bringing anything new to the table. It may aim high but it falls spectacularly short.

Opening track “The Great Unknown” piles on old school ravey synth sounds, while “The Dreamer’s Hotel” is nothing but Prodigy-light. “Modern Living” has something of the flavour of rock jesters the Darkness but would probably even be rejected by them due to its spectacularly naff “we’re apocaholics / drinking gin and tonics” lyrics. Elsewhere there’s a symphonic interlude that seems to have none of the band performing on it, courtesy of the City of Prague Symphony Orchestra and arranged by George Fenton (whose previous notable work includes the soundtrack to Blue Planet). It’s all pretty desperate stuff that suggests a level of self-indulgence not previously foisted upon the listening public since the apex of prog rock, in the 1970s.

Maybe this was all to be predicted after the trite fare that was offered up by Enter Shikari’s last album The Spark, but it is quite a shock to be presented with a disc that doesn’t have any redeeming features whatsoever. It just has to be hoped that Rou Reynolds and his crew have a substantial rethink before their next visit to the recording studio because pretentious nonsense that takes itself this seriously is not something that the band are likely to remember fondly in years to come.

The lyrics betray a shocking amount of cheesey and cliched teenage angst for the work of a group of thirty-somethings

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Guy Oddy clearly knows nothing about music. His review targeting the "ravey synth sounds" making him sound like a posh Opera fan that knows zero about Enter Shikari style or Genre. If E.S is "Cheesey and cliched teenage angst" then the author is an old unknowing fuddy duddy. Go back to reviewing Miley Cyrus and Justin Beiber guy, Your opinion is not wanted

+1 to Richard's reply. Guy, hoping for 15 minutes of fame to try relight his fledgling name?

How ironic that this review attacks the band for phoning it in. This is hack journalism at its finest. You clearly don't like the band or their music, so one wonders why you bothered except to try and earn some kind of credit as a scathing critic. Unfortunately you need credibility, wit, and thoughtful reflection to name just a few barriers you seem to be struggling with. I will give you credit for being accidentally introspective, even if you didn't realise it whatsoever. To use your own phrasing, pretentious nonsense that takes itself this seriously is not something that [you] are likely to remember fondly in years to come.

Is this a review or did Rou just look at you funny one day in a coffee shop? Because honestly you seem angrier at Rou and the band as people than at the music itself - which is what you are meant to be reviewing. The comment about taking themselves too seriously is almost ironic considering who is writing the review. And the fact this band decided to put 'Elegy for Extinction' on the record (composed by Rou, and has all three of the other members in the crescendo, actually) is almost proof itself that they do not take themselves too seriously. I've been in several bands that staple themselves to a genre - and have struggled with how limiting that can be. They actually ADDRESS this absurdity in 'modern living....'. 'Old-school ravey-synth sounds' is the most ignorant (and unknowledgeable) thing I've ever read in a review. Especially a Shikari review, considering that is actually one of the most steadfast examples of what consists an Enter Shikari song. 'Piles on' is the full extent of your actual review of 'THE GREAT UNKNOWN'. The laziness in this writing is apparent from the word "go". I could dissolve your review for hours, but considering it's less of a review and more a 'scathing critic's' anger towards bands that are pushing the fold, changing the atmosphere that you wish to be safe and comfortable for your poor old ears, I imagine this would be like explaining the science of gravity to a flat-earther. What you really need to do is learn and practise critical analysis, accept that maybe you aren't capable of (or can't be bothered) understanding anything deeper than a primary metaphor (Google it) in song lyrics, and then go to Amazon to review the newest shower rail or something. Stop attacking a band for writing music you don't like. This isn't the same as being an actual critic or reviewer.

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