wed 14/11/2018

Fern Brady, Soho Theatre review - opinions with raw edge | reviews, news & interviews

Fern Brady, Soho Theatre review - opinions with raw edge

Fern Brady, Soho Theatre review - opinions with raw edge

Young Scot with desert-dry delivery

Fern Brady has packed a lot in to her 31 years

Fern Brady is a young Scot with plenty of provocative opinions – on politics, society and relationships – with a delivery that can only be described as dry as a desert. It means that some pieces of information – as well as a few gags – take some time to pass through the “Is she joking?” filter. 

In Suffer, Fools she likes to confound audiences with two pieces of information she relates in fairly quick succession; she studied Arabic and Islamic history at Edinburgh University, and she put herself through college by performing at the city's “titty bars”.

Brady neatly fillets those men who still question a woman's place in comedy

She displays her skill at the former, with some quotes form the Koran, but tells us she was rubbish at the latter – not being, as she says, interested in the sexy talk with which she was expected to regale the punters. She puts that down to her self-diagnosed presence on the Asperger's spectrum and therefore having difficulty expressing herself, but I suspect it had more to do with thinking her clients were the fools of the show's title.

In describing an encounter with a Belfast taxi driver, Brady neatly fillets those men who still question a woman's place in comedy, which she uses to discuss gender politics more broadly, and abortion specifically. There is a nicely raw edge to much of what she says, and she happily flirts with shocking the audience without alienating them. She moves on to discussing more personal matters – her current relationship with a man much shorter than her 5ft 10in frame; it's a “tally-smally thing”, she says.

At 31, Brady has packed a lot in – the stripping pales by comparison with the job she had cooking breakfast for a bunch of sex offenders at a halfway house, and she has survived a murder attempt by an ex-boyfriend, stories she tells here as if describing her latest hair appointment – yet her dark comedy sometimes sounds a little undercooked, and needs more killer punchlines.

But Brady has undeniable talent, and is one to watch.

There is a nicely raw edge to much of what she says, and she happily flirts with shocking the audience without alienating them

rating

Editor Rating: 
3
Average: 3 (1 vote)

Share this article

Add comment

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

newsletter

Get a weekly digest of our critical highlights in your inbox each Thursday!

Simply enter your email address in the box below

View previous newsletters