tue 29/07/2014

Resonance | Gaming reviews, news & interviews

Resonance

New point-and-click adventure game is marred by pernickety processes and poor Pixel resolution

'Resonance': more than a homage to Nineties gaming

Science gone horribly wrong. Paper trails as long and arduous as the Northwest Passage. Rogue detectives, ruthless reporters, treacherous geeks and doctors plagued by recurring nightmares. With the end of the world at stake it’s all to play for in Resonance, the new point-and-click adventure game from Xii Games.

Taking place 60 hours before a global cataclysmic event, our four protagonists Ed, Anna, Ray and Bennet, find themselves ensnared in a web of code-breaking, password-stealing, DNA-switching, dream-deciphering and magnet-manipulating machinations, with puzzles harder than the Guardian cryptic crossword.

Not simply a homage to Nineties gaming, Resonance boasts several new developments, such as the ability to alternate between characters in the same scene, positioning them like chess pieces. Note also the creation of two separate inventories for long- and short-term memory, allowing the player to access and utilise their memories on other objects and people.

Unfortunately these inventories are not shared between the four characters, and so interchanging memories and objects can become a pernickety and joyless process at times. Pixel resolution can also be a bit of a fiddle (just like in the old days), meaning objects can be obscured, and if you don’t take care where you hover your cursor, you’ll miss key items and render yourself entirely impotent.

If you haven’t thrown your mouse across the room or slammed your laptop lid down in pure disgust after half-an-hour, then you’re either a genius or you’re using an online walkthrough. In the end it's the satisfaction of working out the puzzles by yourself and watching the excellent story unfold which is the real pay-off.

The protagonists are ensnared in a web of code-breaking, password-stealing, DNA-switching, dream-deciphering machinations

rating

3

Explore topics

Share this article

Add comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Use to create page breaks.

More information about formatting options

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 7,000 pieces, we're asking for £2.95 per month or £25 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

newsletter

Get a weekly digest of our critical highlights in your inbox each Thursday!

Simply enter your email address in the box below

View previous newsletters