fri 06/12/2019

CD: Iguana Death Cult - Nude Casino | reviews, news & interviews

CD: Iguana Death Cult - Nude Casino

CD: Iguana Death Cult - Nude Casino

Undercooked second album undersells Dutch garage-rockers

Iguana Death Cult's 'Nude Casino': demo quality ambience

The contemporary context of the Netherlands’s Iguana Death Cult is clear. Their blues-edged garage rock exists in a continuum encompassing Amyl and The Sniffers, The Chats, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard and Oh Sees. Nude Casino is more measured than the first and second bands, less eclectic than the third and fourth but nonetheless is in tune with a pancontinental reductiveness where the bracing live experience – and relentless touring – is seemingly more important than finessing what’s caught on tape.

Nude Casino, their second album, is hobbled by a flat, one-size-fits-all production in which guitarist/singer Jeroen Reek sounds as if he’s singing through a pillow. Only the snappy bass guitar leaps out. A pity, as what Iguana Death Cult are doing begs for a direct, hard-edged sound stage accentuating the ear-bashing they’re so obviously capable of. Despite the demo quality ambience, they’d evidently be a hoot live: “Bright Lights” swings and sashays with aplomb; the jerky “Carnal Beat Machine” mashes-up Gang Of Four and surf rock; “Chinatown” sticks Young Knives in a blender with “Search and Destroy”. As their allusory handle concedes, Iguana Death Cult aren’t shy of acknowledging where they’re coming from.

What’s also clear but more surprising is a kinship with a raft of Eighties bands. The title track, “Bright Lights” and “Lorraine” all have distinct whiffs of first-album Gun Club. “Tuesday’s Lament” evokes Hoodoo Gurus. Much of the album is simpatico with the post-Mission of Burma outfit Volcano Suns.

Ultimately though, it’s a fair bet Iguana Death Cult kick much harder on stage than they do on Nude Casino.

It’s a fair bet Iguana Death Cult kick much harder on stage than they do on 'Nude Casino'

rating

Editor Rating: 
3
Average: 3 (1 vote)

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