mon 16/12/2019

book reviews and features

Claire Tomalin: A Life of My Own review - the biographer on herself

Marina Vaizey

The title says it all, or at least quite a lot. Luminously intelligent, an exceptionally hard worker, bilingual in French, a gifted...

Read more...

Anne Applebaum: Red Famine review - hope around a heart of darkness

David Nice

Hands both sensitive and surgical are needed to guide a reader into the heart of the 20th century’s second biggest genocide and out again. Anne Applebaum is the right person for a...

Read more...

Adam Macqueen: The Lies of the Land review - light, but enlightening

Liz Thomson

We are now firmly in the post-truth era as defined by Oxford Dictionaries: "adjective - relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping...

Read more...

Robert Harris: Munich review - reselling Hitler

Jasper Rees

Robert Harris’s first book about Hitler told the story of the hoax diaries which seduced Rupert Murdoch and Hugh Trevor-Roper. After Selling Hitler (1986) came Fatherland (1992...

Read more...

John le Carré: A Legacy of Spies review - the master in twilight mood

Marina Vaizey

Over his long career – 23 novels, memoirs, his painfully believable narratives adapted into extraordinary films (10 for the big screen) and for television – John le Carré has created a world that...

Read more...

Extract: Peter Brook - Tip of the Tongue: Reflections on Language and Meaning

Peter Brook

A long time ago when I was very young, a voice hidden deep within me whispered, "Don’t take anything for granted. Go and see for yourself." This little nagging murmur has led me to so...

Read more...

Sigrid Rausing: Mayhem review - you want it darker?

Sebastian Scotney

There is fictional Nordic noir. And then there is this, the real thing. Subject matter really couldn’t be much darker than that of Mayhem: A Memoir in which publisher,...

Read more...

Val McDermid: Insidious Intent review - dark and expert crime writing

Marina Vaizey

Val McDermid has written close on 30 award-winning thrillers and suspense novels, in four series, since...

Read more...

Omar Robert Hamilton: The City Always Wins review - Egypt's revolution, up close and personal

Boyd Tonkin

A few days ago we learned that British taxpayers have unwittingly donated around £1m. in aid to the police and court systems of Egypt’s military dictatorship, via an opaque “Conflict, Stability...

Read more...

Fred Vargas: The Accordionist review - intriguing Gallic sleuthing yarn

Marina Vaizey

The two haunting series of crime ...

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Hewitt, Clein, Aurora Orchestra, Ward, Kings Place review –...

Why does music suddenly disappear? It is all the more heartening when a work as excellent and enjoyable as Louise Farrenc’s Symphony No. 3 takes...

Albums of the Year 2019: Angie McMahon - Salt

Appearing on NPR Music’s legendary Tiny Desk Concert series back in autumn, Taylor Swift talked about how, in...

Agatha and the Curse of Ishtar, Channel 5 review - a diverti...

Christmas and Agatha Christie are a very good fit – how better to spend time with your loved ones than sitting down to watch some murder and...

theartsdesk on Vinyl 55: Peaky Blinders, Graham Coxon, 2 Ton...

Britain is unpleasant to look at right now, ugly and foolish, so why not lock down with some tuneage. Below is the best plastic that’s hit...

Outer Limits, Studio 9294 review - quickfire sets and snowma...

Whatever your office Christmas party was like, I can (almost) guarantee that it wasn’t as much fun as Fire Records’. Running from five to midnight...

Nalini Singh: A Madness of Sunshine review – a lacklustre th...

Nalini Singh's debut thriller thrusts us into Golden Cove, a small coastal town in...

Eva Meijer: Animal Languages review - do you talk crow?

Animal intelligence has come to the fore as an essential and fashionable subject for study. Dolphins, elephants, bees, prairie dogs, gannets,...

Reissue CDs Weekly: Jim Sullivan

Hugh Hefner established Playboy Records in 1972 as an arm of...

Sema Kaygusuz: Every Fire You Tend review – an education in...

In March 1937, the government of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk instigated what it called a “disciplinary campaign” against the Zaza-speaking Alevi Kurds...

Blu-ray: A Fistful of Dynamite

A Fistful of Dynamite and Once Upon a Time in America are Sergio Leone’s films with the most explicit political underpinning....

newsletter

Get a weekly digest of our critical highlights in your inbox each Thursday!

Simply enter your email address in the box below

View previous newsletters