tue 20/02/2024

book reviews and features

Warhol, Velázquez, and leaving things out: an interview with Lynne Tillman

Alice Brewer

Motion Sickness (1991) is the second novel published by the writer, art collector and cultural critic Lynne Tillman. It is difficult,...

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Celia Dale: Sheep's Clothing review - unsettling, mundane, and right on-trend

CP Hunter

Celia Dale published 13 novels between 1944 and her death in 2011. A majority of her these are often categorised – albeit loosely – as...

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Lutz Seiler: Pitch & Glint review - real verse power

Jack Barron

Reading the torrent of press-releases and blurbs on the many – and ever-growing – contemporary poetry collections over time, one starts to notice a distinct recurrence of certain buzzwords: ...

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Zadie Smith: The Fraud review - the trials we inherit

India Lewis

Zadie Smith’s latest novel, The Fraud, is her first venture into historical fiction – a fiction based...

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Caitlin Merrett King: Always Open Always Closed review - looking for an approach while trying to do the approach

Alice Brewer

Always Open Always Closed is Caitlin Merrett King’s first published work of fiction, and it begins...

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Marie Darrieussecq: Sleepless review - in search of lost sleep

Jack Barron

“I lost sleep.” So begins Marie Darrieussecq’s elegantly fitful book, Sleepless, now perceptively translated into...

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Tony Williams: Cole the Magnificent - fantastical tale blends myth, poetry and comedy

Bernard Hughes

Cole the Magnificent is a picaresque, fantastical tale of the life (or lives) of a man, Cole, following...

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Masha Karp: George Orwell and Russia review - dystopia's reality

Hugh Barnes

The war in Ukraine, which Russia’s President Vladimir Putin insists on calling a “special military operation”, may have given fresh urgency to...

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Henry Hoke: Open Throat review - if a lion could speak

India Lewis

I approached Henry Hoke’s fifth book, Open Throat, with some trepidation. A slim novel (156 pages), it...

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First Person: Marc Burrows on getting to know Sir Terry Pratchett

Marc Burrows

In a very real sense, Terry Pratchett taught me how to write. I first came across his work when I was 12 years old, in the early 90s.

My parents had been given copies of two of the earliest...

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The Way, BBC One review - steeltown blues

This three-part drama arrives trailing clouds of big-byline...

Dance for Ukraine Gala, London Palladium review - a second r...

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Sheila Heti: Alphabetical Diaries review - an A-Z of inner l...

After a first read of the blurb for Sheila Heti’s Alphabetical Diaries, you might be forgiven for assuming that this is merely a gimmick...

Blu-ray: Jerzy Skolimowski - Walkower, Bariera, Dialóg 20-40...

Diving into this three-disc set of early films by maverick...

Kin, Series 2, BBC One review - when crime dynasties collide

The end of the first series of Kin found Dublin’s Kinsella crime family ridding themselves of bloodsucking...

Fung, BBC Philharmonic, Weilerstein, Bridgewater Hall, Manch...

Placing the UK premiere of Katherine Balch’s whisper concerto (for cello and orchestra) after...

Paul Foot, Soho Theatre review - how to discover the meaning...

It's probably fair to say that Paul Foot is an acquired taste for some; his absurdist, poetic comedy isn't for everyone but he has built a strong...

Album: MGMT - Loss of Life

The dolefulness of the title Loss of Life is reflected by what’s in the grooves. The lyrics of the Todd Rundgren/Queen-esque fifth track...

Music Reissues Weekly: Lou Christie - Gypsy Bells

Lou Christie fancied offering some social comment. The lyrics of his May 1967 single “Self Expression (The Kids on the Street Will Never Give in...

Turning the Screw, King’s Head Theatre review - Britten and...

David Hemmings was, by his own later admission, a knowing and bumptious boy when Britten cast him as the ill-fated Miles in his operatic...

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