sat 27/05/2017

thomas h green

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Bio
Thomas writes regularly for the Daily Telegraph and Mixmag. He has been a consistent presence in the UK dance music media since the mid-Nineties and has also written more broadly about music and the arts elsewhere. He has written one book, Rock Shrines, with another on the way. An ageing raver, he’s still occasionally to be found in nightclubs as dawn approaches.

Articles By Thomas H Green

CD: DJ Hell - Zukunfstmusik

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theartsdesk on Vinyl 28: Manic Street Preachers, Joep Beving, Wreckless Eric, SWANS and more

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Adam Buxton's Bowie Bug, Brighton Festival review - a comic PowerPoint masterclass

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Rich Hall's Hoedown, Brighton Festival review - country comedy trumps hecklers

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m¡longa, Brighton Festival review - sensual tango explosion

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CD: Shitkid - Fish

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Jeremy Hardy, Brighton Festival review - expert raconteur shows political bite

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Casus Circus Driftwood, Brighton Festival review - eye-boggling gymnastic theatre

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High Focus Records showcase, Brighton Festival review - smart hip hop, dodgy sound

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Kate Tempest with Orchestrate, Brighton Festival review - heartfelt poetic dynamite

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CD: Pumarosa - The Witch

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Jeramee, Hartleby and Oooglemore, Brighton Festival review - impeccably crafted silliness

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Under The Skin, Brighton Festival review - slow-burning sci-fi gem with live Mica Levi soundtrack

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For The Birds, Brighton Festival review - 'night walk into exquisite sensory thrills'

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theartsdesk on Vinyl 27: Spoon, Hauschka, Emerson, Lake & Palmer and more

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CD: Kasabian - For Crying Out Loud

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latest in today

The best TV to watch this week

So much to view, so little time... theartsdesk sorts the TV-wheat from the telly-chaff.

Saturday 27 May...

theartsdesk Q&A: Soprano Aida Garifullina

There are certain roles where you’re lucky to catch one perfect incarnation in a lifetime. I thought I'd never see a soprano as Natasha in...

An Octoroon review - slavery reprised as melodrama in a vibr...

Make no mistake about it, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins is a ...

Swans, Asylum, Birmingham

There are not many bands who are obtuse enough to begin a gig with a 45 minute unrecorded song, especially when they are preparing to go their...

The Red Turtle review - Studio Ghibli loses its magic touch

A man is caught up in a storm at sea; giant waves like Hokusai crests throw him onto a deserted tropical island. Over the next 80 minutes, his...

CD: DJ Hell - Zukunfstmusik

Helmut Geir has been around the block multiple times but, like an electro-sonic Batman, always pops up just when he’s needed. Never much moved by...

Paula, BBC Two review - Denise Gough's the real thing

Playwrights have long migrated to the small screen in search of better pay and room to manoeuvre. Most don’t leave it as long as Conor McPherson,...

Deposit, Hampstead Theatre Downstairs review - capital'...

Matt Hartley's personal take on London's housing crisis returns to the...

The Other Side of Hope review - Aki Kaurismäki at his tragic...

It takes real skill to make a film about a desperate Syrian refugee and a dour middle-aged...