fri 01/07/2016

Sarah Kent

sarah.kent

Sarah Kent's picture
Bio
Sarah was the visual arts editor art of Time Out, the ICA’s Director of Exhibitions, has served on Turner Prize and other juries, and has written catalogues for the Hayward, ICA, Saatchi Gallery, White Cube and Haunch of Venison and books such as Shark-Infested Waters: The Saatchi Collection of British Art in the 90s.

Articles by Sarah Kent

Alex Katz, Serpentine Gallery

Black Brook, 2014, is sublime. Two bands of acid-green grass frame a horizontal band of deep-violet water that appears to have hidden depths. Dotted randomly over the darkness are clusters of light...

Read more...

Found, The Foundling Museum

Cornelia Parker invited over 60 fellow artists to join her in exhibiting at the Foundling Museum in London. Titled Found, the show spills out from the basement gallery to infiltrate every room in the...

Read more...

Jeff Koons: Now, Newport Street Gallery

The second exhibition staged by Damien Hirst in his stunning Newport Street Gallery is of work from his collection by the American artist, Jeff Koons. Hirst was still a student at Goldsmiths when, in...

Read more...

Mona Hatoum, Tate Modern

Mona Hatoum was born in Beirut of Palestinian parents. She came to London to study at the Slade School in 1975 and got stuck here when civil war broke out in Lebanon, preventing her from returning...

Read more...

Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures

“Look at the pictures”, yells apoplectic Senator Jesse Helms as he brandishes a clutch of photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe, “a known homosexual who died of AIDS”. It's 1989 and Senator Helms is...

Read more...

Conceptual Art in Britain 1964-1979, Tate Britain

The exhibition starts promisingly. You can help yourself to an orange from Roelof Louw’s pyramid of golden fruit. Its a reminder that, for the conceptualists, art was a verb not a noun. Focusing on...

Read more...

Magical Surfaces: The Uncanny in Contemporary Photography, Parasol Unit

Magical Surfaces: The Uncanny in Contemporary Photography focuses on two contrasting generations. Beginning in the 1970s, Stephen Shore and Joel Sternfeld travelled America photographing things that...

Read more...

Franciszka & Stefan Themerson, Camden Arts Centre

Bertrand Russell’s History of the World is a charming little booklet that carries a chilling message: “Since Adam and Eve ate the apple, man has never refrained from any folly of which he is capable...

Read more...

Paul Strand, Victoria & Albert Museum

Once you’ve seen him, you can’t forget him. Taken in 1951, Paul Strand’s black and white portrait of a French teenager sears itself onto your retina. He stares unflinchingly back, and looking into...

Read more...

Hilma Af Klint, Serpentine Gallery

Celebrating the four ages of man, eight huge, semi-abstract paintings create a carnival atmosphere in the Serpentine’s central gallery. The freshness of Childhood is characterised by flowers, petals...

Read more...

Performing for the Camera, Tate Modern

The earliest known selfie is as old as the medium itself – literally. Hippolyte Bayard, one of the inventors of photography, pictured himself as a drowned man. His technique of photographic printing...

Read more...

Saul Leiter, Photographers' Gallery

One of the great joys of being a critic is discovering someone remarkable you’ve never heard of before. By the time he died in 2013 aged 90, the American photographer Saul Leiter had gained a degree...

Read more...

Yuletide Scenes: Piero della Francesca's Nativity

At first sight Piero della Francesca’s The Nativity appears to be a simple picture, especially when compared with more flamboyant depictions of the scene by artists such as Gentile de Fabriano,...

Read more...

Rose English, Camden Arts Centre

I think of Rose English as the performer who made Miranda Hart’s success possible. I remember seeing her back in the 1980s, improvising solo at a theatre in Chenies Street. She had the audience...

Read more...

Fabio Mauri: Oscuramento, Hauser & Wirth

Following his inclusion in this year’s Venice and Istanbul biennials, Italian artist Fabio Mauri has leapt into the limelight. He is from the same generation as Mario Merz; but whereas Merz and his...

Read more...

Susan Philipsz: War Damaged Musical Instruments, Tate Britain

Tate Britain’s Duveen Galleries are currently filled with a hauntingly beautiful sound installation by Susan Philipsz (main picture). The Scottish artist won the Turner Prize in 2010 for a sound...

Read more...

latest in today

David Hockney RA: 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life, Royal Acade...

An ongoing series of portraits has served as a tonic during difficult times...

Natalia Osipova, Sadler's Wells

Superstar ballerina and new partner Sergei Polunin lack lustre in self-comm...

Freud: Genius of the Modern World, BBC Four

Dr Freud takes his turn in the psychiatrist's chair

DVD: A Month in the Country

Elegiac adaptation of a much-loved novella, returning after a long absence

Die Walküre, Opera North, Southbank Centre

The Ring's most wrenching tragedy excels with a great Wotan and Brünnh...

theartsdesk at Glastonbury Festival 2016

The real world and the weather impinged but couldn't keep Glastonbury...

Bugsy Malone, Lyric Hammersmith

Generation-bridging joy with the return of the mobster musical pastiche

CD: Chrissy & Hawley - Chrissy & Hawley

Is there anything left to mine in the eternal Eighties revival?

Das Rheingold, Opera North, Southbank Centre

Fiery demi-god and conductor eclipse any B-casting as a Ring comes south

Faith Healer, Donmar Warehouse

Revival of Brian Friel’s 1979 classic is brilliantly acted and utterly comp...