sun 21/09/2014

Marina Vaizey

marina.vaizey

Marina Vaizey's picture
Bio
Marina Vaizey was art critic for the Financial Times, then the Sunday Times, edited the Art Quarterly, has been a judge for the Turner Prize, and a trustee of several museums; books include 100 Masterpieces, The Artist as Photographer and Great Women Collectors. She's currently a freelance art critic and lecturer. This drawing of Marina as a character from Jane Austen is 40 years old.

Articles by Marina Vaizey

Whistler and the Thames: An American in London, Dulwich Picture Gallery

Dulwich Picture Gallery, the oldest publicly accessible painting collection in England, is hardly on the bank of the Thames, but its compilation of prints, drawings, watercolours and paintings by...

Read more...

Elizabeth I and Her People, National Portrait Gallery

At the beginning of the 17th century an anonymous Anglo-Netherlandish artist produced an elaborate procession portrait of the septuagenarian Virgin Queen, tactfully portrayed as though several...

Read more...

Paul Klee: Making Visible, Tate Modern

"The objects in pictures look out at us serene or severe, tense or relaxed, comforting or forbidding, suffering or smiling." Thus said Paul Klee (1879-1940) in a lecture on modern art in 1924. It is...

Read more...

Shunga: Sex and Pleasure in Japanese Art, British Museum

Sex please, we are Japanese. This astonishing collection of about 170 paintings, prints and illustrated books from 300 years of Japanese art, known as “shunga” or spring pictures, come in part from...

Read more...

Francis Bacon/Henry Moore: Flesh and Bone, Ashmolean Museum

It is a shock, in this succinct exhibition of two British colossi of the past century, Henry Moore (1898-1986) and Francis Bacon (1909-1992), to be reminded of just how colossal and original are...

Read more...

Richard Rogers: Inside Out, Royal Academy, Burlington Gardens

Richard Rogers is addicted to colour. His wardrobe dazzles, and this biographical anthology opens with a selection of Rogers’ aphorisms and statements in bold black on a wall painted a coruscating...

Read more...

Laura Knight: Portraits, National Portrait Gallery

Laura Knight’s wartime masterpiece Ruby Loftus Screwing a Breech-Ring (1943) is a subtly glamorous picture, strikingly composed. A frieze of blue-clad women at an armament factory workbench are in...

Read more...

Collecting Gauguin, Courtauld Gallery

A one-room display at the Courtauld of seven paintings, a wall of woodcuts, some drawings and a sculpture by the passionate and volatile Gauguin: for all its modesty, this is a staggeringly powerful...

Read more...

Vermeer & Music: The Art of Love and Leisure, National Gallery

Music and art have been intertwined for millennia, the static, frozen and soundless moment of paint capturing the feeling and the meaning of ephemeral time-based music. And nowhere can the act of...

Read more...

A Crisis of Brilliance, Dulwich Picture Gallery

The very tall, skeletal and formidable Henry Tonks (1862-1937), surgeon and anatomist, became one of the most decisive, influential, scathing and inspirational teachers in the history of visual...

Read more...

Anthony Caro: Park Avenue Series, Gagosian Gallery

Sir Anthony Caro, OM, is wowing them in Venice with his masterly retrospective, but for those of us who can’t get there, there is a generous helping of his characteristic late work in his first show...

Read more...

Patrick Caulfield/Gary Hume, Tate Britain

Patrick Caulfield (1936-2005) is the greatest late 20th-century British painter the international art world has never heard of. This quietly magnificent exhibition of about 35 paintings, most of them...

Read more...

Birth of a Collection: The Barber Institute, National Gallery

Lady Barber (1869-1933) née Hattie Onions, had her portrait painted in sumptuous style about 30 times, mostly in a sub-Orpen vein, and almost all by the unknown Belgian Nestor Cambier. But that was...

Read more...

Master Drawings, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Michelangelo evidently regarded drawing as the foundation of not only painting and sculpture but  of “architecture and of every other kind of painting and the root of all science”. His all-...

Read more...

Leon Kossoff: London Landscapes, Annely Juda Fine Art

Sixty years of hard work, encapsulated in 90 drawings and a handful of thickly encrusted paintings, by the distinguished, obsessive, single-minded octagenerian artist Leon Kossoff (b 1926) vividly...

Read more...

William Scott: Divided Figure, Jerwood Gallery, Hastings

Down by the seaside, an array of rather lumpen large naked women are marching, posing, reclining, and even rolling over along the walls of the new Jerwood Gallery, delineated by William Scott (1913-...

Read more...