sat 29/08/2015

Marina Vaizey

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Bio
Marina Vaizey was art critic for the Financial Times, then the Sunday Times, edited the Art Quarterly, has been a judge for the Turner Prize, and a trustee of several museums; books include 100 Masterpieces, The Artist as Photographer and Great Women Collectors. She's currently a freelance art critic and lecturer. This drawing of Marina as a character from Jane Austen is 40 years old.

Articles by Marina Vaizey

Shark, BBC One

It is perhaps a clever piece of ironic perversity to have scheduled the first part of a three-part documentary on sharks on polling day, but the subject here is the comings and goings inside the...

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YZ Kami, Gagosian Gallery

The Iranian-born New York resident painter YZ Kami, now in his mid-fifties, continually plays with our hunger to look at “reality” while being seduced by abstraction and repetition. In 17 canvases,...

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Ravilious, Dulwich Picture Gallery

Look at me, and think of England. This marvellous array of quirky, idiosyncratic watercolours by Eric Ravilious (1903-1942) from the 1930s until his premature death during wartime when his plane, on...

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Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden, The Queen's Gallery

The young, rather homely yet grand gentleman is lounging under a tree, behind him a formal knot garden. His costume is extravagant and rich, and his hat is charming. This exquisite 1590s miniature by...

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Wellington: Triumphs, Politics and Passions, National Portrait Gallery

One masterpiece and two superb portraits both dominate and sum up in vivid fashion the complex personality, long life and astonishing trajectory of the first Duke of WellingtonThere were something...

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Written By Mrs Bach, BBC Four

The Australian musician and musicologist Martin Jarvis, connected with Charles Darwin University in the Northern Territory, has been obsessed for the past 25 years with proving that Anna Magdalena...

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Sex, Lies and Love Bites: The Agony Aunt Story, BBC Four

Philippa Perry, 20 years a psychotherapist, was the dashing narrator of this history of 300 years of agony aunts (or uncles). Wearing a bright orange coat, she cycled between libraries, universities...

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Inventing Impressionism, National Gallery

Here is an exhibition that tells us how something we now take totally for granted actually came about: how our love affair with the Impressionists was masterminded by an art dealer, Paul Durand-Ruel...

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Super-Powered Owls: Natural World, BBC Two

The owl – symbol of wisdom, harbinger of death – is a powerful if disparate symbol in human mythology worldwide. But this outstanding visual essay provided a riveting array of astonishing facts...

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Sculpture Victorious, Tate Britain

Recent attitudes to Victorian Britain have changed radically. The popular view used to be of a period filled with a kind of smug imperial confidence, underwritten by the increasing wealth of the...

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Whitworth Art Gallery Reopens with a Meteoric Bang

The Whitworth Art Gallery was showered with meteors in a spectacle devised by the artist Cornelia Parker on its reopening weekend – appropriately Valentine’s Day. The £15m project (architects MUMA)...

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Indian Summers, Channel 4

In the tradition of A Passage to India, The Jewel in the Crown and Staying On, Indian Summers is ambitious, a serious soap attempting to show the dying days of the Raj through a host of interwoven...

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Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends, National Portrait Gallery

Oh, Dr Pozzi! This gorgeous man is garbed in a red wool, full-length robe, almost completely obscuring his elegantly gleaming white shirt. The shirt collar frames his face, casting light, and its...

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The Secret World of Lewis Carroll, BBC Two

Alice is always with us; the most quoted work of literature, after the Bible and Shakespeare. In fact, Desert Island Discs should probably add Alice to the mandatory Bible and Shakespeare as an...

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National Gallery

The octogenarian Frederick Wiseman is a cult documentary film maker, with his own idiosyncratic and recognisable idiom. He has both vast experience and extraordinary independence. Characteristically...

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Rubens: An Extra Large Story, BBC Two

The ebullient presenter, writer and director Waldemar Januszczak opens his enthusiastic and proselytising hour-long film on Sir Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) by reading out a series of disparaging...

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