sat 01/11/2014

Marina Vaizey

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Bio
Marina Vaizey was art critic for the Financial Times, then the Sunday Times, edited the Art Quarterly, has been a judge for the Turner Prize, and a trustee of several museums; books include 100 Masterpieces, The Artist as Photographer and Great Women Collectors. She's currently a freelance art critic and lecturer. This drawing of Marina as a character from Jane Austen is 40 years old.

Articles by Marina Vaizey

Imagine... The Art That Hitler Hated, BBC One

Alan Yentob’s culture programme, Imagine, returned for its autumn season with a two-part examination of one of the most potently disturbing episodes in the history of art, let alone culture. Even...

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Anarchy and Beauty: William Morris and His Legacy, National Portrait Gallery

Can you sense a person's life through a sequence of objects? Not to mention influence and legacy? Biographical exhibitions are fascinating, not least because they also tell us something about looking...

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Gerhard Richter, Marian Goodman Gallery

Another October and another Frieze week just passed. This means the biggest of big hitters have been turning up in London. The economic quantifiers aren’t precise, but there have been plenty of...

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Schama on Rembrandt: Masterpieces of the Late Years, BBC Two

The chatty, loquacious, exuberant Simon Schama, whose seminal 1987 book on Holland in the 17th century, The Embarrassment of Riches, transformed the anglophone’s understanding of the Dutch Republic,...

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Richard Serra, Gagosian Gallery

The septuagenarian American sculptor Richard Serra can treat the most massive sheets of steel as though they are handy pieces of paper for his version of origami; or he can decide to stack huge dense...

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Germany: Memories of a Nation, British Museum

There is a 1953 Volkswagen parked in the Great Court of the British Museum, and we are reminded that Hitler persuaded Frederick Porsche (who gave his name of course to a hideously expensive luxury...

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Sigmar Polke: Alibis, Tate Modern

England is in the throes of an unusual Teutonic love fest, and in 2014 no doubt deliberately. Music of course has always been omnipresent: Bach to Wagner, and a passion for Beethoven and Schubert...

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Cat Watch 2014: The New Horizon Experiment, BBC Two

Cats have had a harder time adapting to humans than humans to cats, as this remarkable examination of contemporary feline habits points out. It is not always easy changing from wild animal to feline...

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Blenheim Palace: Great War House, ITV

Julian Fellowes, now the Conservative peer Lord Fellowes, left behind the fictional world of Gosford Park and Downton Abbey to give us this sumptuous tour of Blenheim Palace. Nor were its...

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Ming: 50 Years That Changed China, British Museum

Here be dragons, and plum blossoms in moonlight, model chariots, 15th-century paper money, weaponry and armour, embroidered robes, blue and white porcelain, vivid portraits of the court eunuchs,...

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Constable: The Making of a Master, Victoria & Albert Museum

This revelatory exhibition goes in search of the revolutionary magnificence which infused Constable’s compelling landscapes through an unusual prism. The narrative spine is clear. It follows...

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Jungle Atlantis, BBC Two

Angkor Wat in Cambodia is the biggest religious complex ever built. It is also one of the most beautiful and awe-inspiring structures ever created, even now still a working temple with both Buddhist...

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Anthony Caro: The Last Sculptures, Annely Juda

Late Titian, Late Rembrandt, Late Picasso, Late Matisse…. What is it with Late that seems to give some artists a Golden Age irradiated by a kind of sublime carelessness, a genuine sense of anything...

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Francesca Woodman: Zigzag, Victoria Miro

Francesca Woodman killed herself at the age of 22, the biographical fact that colours her work and which it is de riguer to mention. She left behind paintings, it is said, as yet publicly unseen, and...

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British Art at War: Bomberg, Sickert and Nash, BBC Four

At the end of this absorbing documentary about the art – and life – of Paul Nash we visited his tombstone in a Buckinghamshire churchyard, accompanying writer and presenter Andrew Graham-Dixon as he...

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The Rules of Abstraction with Matthew Collings, BBC Four

Artist and critic Matthew Collings purported to set out the rules of abstraction through taking the viewer on a very bumpy ride through 20th century painting, with a nod to Cézanne to get us started...

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