tue 04/08/2015

Heather Neill

Heather Neill

Heather Neill's picture
Bio
Heather Neill is a critic and theatre writer. She was Arts Editor of The Times Educational Supplement and has contributed features to The Times, Telegraph and theatre programmes. She reviews for The Stage, interviews for theatrevoice.com and has been a judge of the Offies and the Theatre Book Prize and an assessor for NT Connections.

Articles by Heather Neill

We Made It: Coracle Maker Malcolm Rees

Over the past few months of We Made It, we've explored some very traditional crafts, but few that have such a direct link to the distant past as this. Malcolm Rees is one of a handful of people in...

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The Gathered Leaves, Park Theatre

Families. Whether it's the House of Atreus, the court at Elsinore or the Archers, they tend to be of compelling interest. For most of us, loyalties, guilty secrets, truths that will out, petty...

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Skin in Flames, Park Theatre

The premise might seem familiar: a famous photograph, taken by a Western journalist in fraught military and political circumstances, has repercussions many years later. The subject of the picture, a...

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We Made It: Candle Maker Ted Thompson

The arts will always rely on craft – and that goes a hundredfold when period detail is important. The atmosphere of Sam Wanamaker's recreation of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in Southwark is dependent...

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We Made It: Digital Knitters Knyttan

Hand knitting has had a bit of a moment recently. Making your very own jumper was suddenly fashionable, but the knitter still had to follow, stitch by stitch, a pattern invented by someone else. And...

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Play Mas, Orange Tree Theatre

Mustapha Matura's 1974 play is a celebration of liberation, both social and political, and a sly warning about the possible pitfalls of sudden freedom. Mas (or Masquerade) is the Trinidadian version...

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Kill Me Now, Park Theatre

The big news was that dashing Greg Wise was returning to the London stage after an absence of 17 years. Still best remembered as the handsome cad Willoughby in the film of Sense and Sensibility...

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Taken at Midnight, Theatre Royal Haymarket

The mother, so often a sentimental figure in art, can be as tenacious and bold as any animal when protecting her young. Mark Hayhurst's play about Irmgard Litten, mother of Hans, a lawyer who cross-...

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Almost, Maine, Park Theatre

For a Christmas-weary Brit who's already had it up to here with commercial bonhomie and festive schmaltz, there were going to be barriers to overcome. Here is an avowedly sweet American play –...

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The Edge of Our Bodies, Gate Theatre

Sixteen-year-old Bernadette is determined to write short stories. She's a promising writer, describing her own feelings, the strangers and friends who cross her path in telling detail. Occasionally,...

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Ballyturk, National Theatre

In his masterly essay in the programme for Enda Walsh's latest play, Colm Tóibín warns against attempting to pin his work to a particular philosophical position, but simply to read into it a metaphor...

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The Flouers o'Edinburgh, Finborough Theatre

There are 15 characters in Robert McLellan's quirky 1948 comedy, but the star is the language most of them speak. To mark the referendum later this month, the Finborough is mounting a season of...

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Medea, National Theatre

We know how the story ends, but then so did Euripides' first audience in Athens in 431 BC. Medea was already a familiar character of myth, a sorceress whose ungovernable passion for Jason led her to...

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Daytona, Theatre Royal Haymarket

When Daytona was premiered at the Park Theatre last year some of the critics went into contortions to avoid giving away the two "reveals" in Oliver Cotton's plot. The challenge remains, but can there...

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Hobson's Choice, Open Air Theatre, Regent's Park

Director Nadia Fall has taken that patriarchal purveyor of footwear Henry Horatio Hobson and his family out of their natural habitat - a traditional proscenium arch theatre - and into a different...

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Johnny Got His Gun, Southwark Playhouse

"Johnny get your gun" was a popular American recruiting call in the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries and, according to the Irish-American song "When Johnny comes marching home, Hurrah,...

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