sun 01/03/2015

Demetrios Matheou

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Bio
Demetrios Matheou is the film critic for The Sunday Herald. His writing has appeared in The Guardian and Observer, The Times and Sunday Times, The Independent on Sunday and Sight & Sound. He is the author of The Faber Book of New South American Cinema, and a contributor to Cinema: The Whole Story and Ten Bad Dates With De Niro. He is also a film programmer and has served on the juries of a number of international film festivals.

Articles by Demetrios Matheou

The Philadelphia Story

Cynical writer Macaulay Connor (Jimmy Stewart) and pragmatic photographer Elizabeth Imbrie (Ruth Hussey) are the tabloid team charged with getting the undercover scoop on the society wedding of the...

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The Ruling Class, Trafalgar Studios

Now that the national self-delusion of the classless society has been laid to rest by the double whammy of economic crisis and the Cameron-Osborne-Johnson era of Bullingdon Club governance, it would...

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The Theory of Everything

It’s Turing versus Hawking, Cumberbatch v Redmayne, computer science v astrophysics, tragedy v the triumph of love. Ever since The Imitation Game and The Theory of  Everything appeared at the...

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theartsdesk at the Dubai International Film Festival

Dubai is a city that famously emerged from the desert, founded on oil and ambition, rising in an eruption of skyscrapers, luxury resorts and bling.One might say that Gulf cinema is also trying to...

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theartsdesk at the Viennale

We’ve grown accustomed to cinemas asking punters to pocket their cell phones, or prohibiting food and drink inside the auditorium. But an unassuming sign on the doors of the Gartenbaukino in Vienna...

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LFF 2014: Wild Tales

Argentine cinema is best known for its serious side – finely-honed arthouse fare from the likes of Lucrecia Martel, Pablo Trapero and Lisandro Alonso. But the Argentines can do mainstream very well....

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LFF 2014: Camp X-Ray

What can another film about American malfeasance in its War on Terror add to our knowledge and disapproval? Camp X-Ray has too narrow a scope to offer much; yet it’s impossible not to be affected by...

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Electra, Old Vic

As revered as the Greek tragedies may be, I have to admit to feeling a little weary of all that conspicuous, over-ripe angst, and the expectation of our sympathy, even empathy for matricides,...

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The James Plays, National Theatre

Rona Munro’s trilogy of plays about Scotland’s Stuart kings premiered at the Edinburgh Festival when Scottish independence was, for many, still a cherished possibility; it transfers to London –...

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A Most Wanted Man

Other films have been and still will be released featuring Philip Seymour Hoffman, since his death earlier this year. But A Most Wanted Man is the one that serves as the final testament to what’s...

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True West, Tricycle Theatre

Time doesn’t take any of the edge off Sam Shepard’s rollicking reflection on the dichotomy of America, the tussle between the myth and the dream, represented by two warring brothers trapped with an...

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God's Pocket

Now that the shock and dismay over Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death has subsided, we have the chance to see his final performances and recall an actor like few others. I can’t think of many who managed...

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A Streetcar Named Desire, Young Vic

The latest production of Tennessee Williams’s sultry, brutal yet poetic masterpiece is mainstream theatre that dares to go out on a limb. Directed by Benedict Andrews, it may occasionally miss a beat...

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Richard III, Trafalgar Studios

Imagine Dr Watson trying his hand at Moriarty? That’s not the challenge of this Richard III, but the exciting prospect instead is to see an actor usually called upon to be the sidekick and nice guy...

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Camille Claudel 1915

Camille Claudel was not only Rodin’s student, mistress and muse, but a talented sculptor in her own right. Some years after the two parted, her mental health started to decline. In 1913 her family...

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Fathers and Sons, Donmar Warehouse

Brian Friel’s affinity with Russian writers, notably Chekhov and Turgenev, is central to his work, the playwright seeing similarities between their tragi-comic characters, hanging onto “old...

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How to contact Demetrios Matheou

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Benedetti, La Cetra, Saffron Hall

The violinist's Vivaldi charms an appreciative audience in a bold new...

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

The expats are back in that rare sequel that betters its predecessor

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