sat 23/08/2014

Demetrios Matheou

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Bio
Demetrios Matheou is the film critic for The Sunday Herald. His writing has appeared in The Guardian and Observer, The Times and Sunday Times, The Independent on Sunday and Sight & Sound. He is the author of The Faber Book of New South American Cinema, and a contributor to Cinema: The Whole Story and Ten Bad Dates With De Niro. He is also a film programmer and has served on the juries of a number of international film festivals.

Articles by Demetrios Matheou

God's Pocket

Now that the shock and dismay over Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death has subsided, we have the chance to see his final performances and recall an actor like few others. I can’t think of many who managed...

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A Streetcar Named Desire, Young Vic

The latest production of Tennessee Williams’s sultry, brutal yet poetic masterpiece is mainstream theatre that dares to go out on a limb. Directed by Benedict Andrews, it may occasionally miss a beat...

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Richard III, Trafalgar Studios

Imagine Dr Watson trying his hand at Moriarty? That’s not the challenge of this Richard III, but the exciting prospect instead is to see an actor usually called upon to be the sidekick and nice guy...

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Camille Claudel 1915

Camille Claudel was not only Rodin’s student, mistress and muse, but a talented sculptor in her own right. Some years after the two parted, her mental health started to decline. In 1913 her family...

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Fathers and Sons, Donmar Warehouse

Brian Friel’s affinity with Russian writers, notably Chekhov and Turgenev, is central to his work, the playwright seeing similarities between their tragi-comic characters, hanging onto “old...

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A Thousand Times Good Night

Juliette Binoche gives a powerful performance at the heart of a thought-provoking, very topical drama, whose flaws reflect its difficult subject matter.The Frenchwoman plays Rebecca, a highly-rated...

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theartsdesk in Panama: Hubris, suffering and cinema

The contradictions and iniquities of Panama City were very much in evidence last week. The city opened Central America’s first subway system, which many claim is a $2billion folie de grandeur for...

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Fatal Attraction, Theatre Royal Haymarket

Just before the curtain came up for the second half of Fatal Attraction, a chap sitting behind me told his companion, “All I remember is that it ends quite badly.” It may seem like a cheap shot, from...

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Salvo

Given the world’s most famous crime organisation hails from Italy, it’s odd that we associate the best crime movies with elsewhere, notably Hollywood (not least its quintessential Mafia films, The...

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Q&A Special: Stranger by the Lake

Stranger by the Lake is something of a wonder, a superbly made amalgam of Hitchcockian psychological thriller and explicit homoerotica, whose very presence in commercial cinemas defies convention....

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Bastards

Whenever someone wants to dispel the gender simplification that female directors only make feelgood films, they wheel out Kathryn Bigelow, whose action movies are cited as being tougher than any man’...

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Richard II, Barbican

Richard II arrives in London after a highly successful Stratford run and while the glow of David Tennant’s Hamlet resides still in the memory. Surprisingly, the pleasure of the production lies not so...

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theartsdesk at the Turin Film Festival

Turin, December 2013. Berlusconi has finally been kicked out of the Italian parliament. The country is disaffected, fed up with its politicians, broke. Youngsters, including university students, have...

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Strangers on a Train, Gielgud Theatre

Whether you’re partial to Highsmith or Hitchcock, or both, there’s something deliciously exciting about the prospect of Strangers on a Train. Much of that anticipation lies in the intriguing question...

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Mojo, Harold Pinter Theatre

I first saw Mojo as a film, adapted from the stage and directed by its writer Jez Butterworth in 1997. And it really didn’t work. Set in 1950s Soho and involving club owners, gangsters and a wannabe...

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French Film Festival UK

One might think that of all the national cinemas, the one that least needs its own festival in the UK is the French; after all, Gallic fare has a better showing here than most foreign language films....

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How to contact Demetrios Matheou