sat 23/09/2017

tv

Bad Move, ITV review - Jack Dee resettles in the middle of the road

jasper Rees

That the countryside is a dump where all good things come to a dead end is hardly a new punchline. There are plenty of novels and memoirs, and indeed newspaper columns, about trading the toxic metropolis for the green and unpleasant pastures of the rural life. The joke is it’s mainly horrible for a narrow spectrum of predictable reasons. It’s muddy, petrol costs a bomb, bored kids are forever after lifts, and as for the people…

Read more...

Cinema Through the Eye of Magnum, BBC Four review - moving pictures

marina Vaizey

Magnum was founded just after the war in 1947 as a co-operative that ensured both the quality of its members, and their clout in dealing with the media world. Its longevity is testimony to its success. The original founders were war-hardened photo journalists and included Robert Capa and David “Chim” Seymour; the first woman member was Eve Arnold, who joined in 1951.

Read more...

Black Lake, BBC Four review – Nordic blanc falls flat

adam Sweeting

What would Saturday nights be without BBC Four’s regular subtitle-fests?

Read more...

100 Year Old Driving School, ITV review – a warning with history

Barney Harsent

While Horizon, on BBC2, was telling us that the first person to walk on Mars could well be walking among us now, ITV's 100 Year Old Driving School suggested that the space mission could take a major setback if that wannabe astronaut were to encounter Joan Beech on the roads.

Read more...

Rellik, BBC One review - tricksy procedural messes with time

jasper Rees

There are two Williams brothers – Jack and Harry – who are mainly known for two series of The Missing. No chance of the Williamses going missing. Quite the reverse. As of today – Monday 11 September – they seem to have cloned.

Read more...

Liar, ITV - who, if anybody, is telling the truth?

adam Sweeting

Could handsome, successful, designer-stubbly Ioan Gruffudd really be a rapist? Yes, according to schoolteacher Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt). No, according to Gruffudd’s character Andrew Earlham, a distinguished surgeon and widower apparently horrified to be accused of such a thing.

Read more...

Tin Star, Sky Atlantic - broken characters stalked by remorseless fate

adam Sweeting

Sometimes you can find yourself hankering after those old-fashioned TV dramas where you got a self-contained story every week, so you can drop in on it at any time and still keep up with what’s going on. With Tin Star, on the other hand, you need to stick with it for at least four episodes before the scope of the story begins to reveal itself and it starts to exert a painful grip.

Read more...

Cold Feet, series 7, ITV review - more comedy than drama

Barney Harsent

When the ITV comedy drama Cold Feet returned last year after a 13-year break, it seemed something of a risk. Looking back, after the near-universal acclaim and excellent viewing figures, it’s difficult to think it could have been anything but a sure-fire hit.

Read more...

Safe House, series 2, ITV review - the abduction and captivity show returns

Mark Sanderson

Forget Christopher Eccleston and the Lake District. Two years on, Ed Whitmore’s ready-mix thriller Safe House returns with Stephen Moyer in Merseyside.

Read more...

Doctor Foster, Series 2, BBC One review - belief suspended for a pacy and tense return

Barney Harsent

They say that living well is the best revenge. To be fair, they also say it’s a dish best served cold and I’m pretty sure they’re thinking of gazpacho, so I’m not entirely clear how much real meaning is to be found in these dictums.

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Jasper Johns, Royal Academy review - a master of 50 shades

The Royal Academy has a winning line in spectacular exhibitions that have become essentials in London, theatrically and dramatically revelatory...

Wings, Young Vic review - Juliet Stevenson goes high and low

Now look here, Giles Coren: immersion in a great play well acted can send you out of the theatre feeling very different from when you entered it...

The Tallis Scholars, Phillips, Cadogan Hall review - intimac...

Peter Phillips and the Tallis Scholars have nothing to prove when it comes to Renaissance...

Ramona Tells Jim, Bush Theatre, review – kooky, teenage hear...

Location, location, location. Jim thinks he lives in the “shittiest” small town in Scotland. It’s Mallaig, on the west coast, and he’s a deeply...

Reger Cello Suites, Richard Harwood, Malling Abbey review -...

Three “little greats,” as Opera North might put it, proved just the thing to cleanse the palate in a quiet place the afternoon after the LSO/...

CD: The Killers - Wonderful, Wonderful

The last song on The Killers' new record is called "Have All the Songs Been Written?". The words refer to Brandon Flowers' writers...

Stravinsky Ballets, LSO, Rattle, Barbican review - the big t...

“Next he’ll be walking on water,” allegedly quipped a distinguished figure at the official opening of...

Basquiat: Boom for Real, Barbican review - the myth explored...

Beautiful, shy, charming and talented, Jean-Michel Basquiat was a shining star who streaked across the...