tue 20/02/2018

book reviews and features

theartsdesk at the Port Eliot Festival

Mark Hudson

Remember when festivals were only about what they were ostensibly about? When, say, Reading offered nothing beyond hard rock bar disgusting toilets, overpriced hamburgers and the prospect of a...

Read more...

Extracts: John Tusa - Pain in the Arts

ismene Brown

In the midst of ferment as the arts world faces fast-shrinking public subsidy, Sir John Tusa, former managing director of the BBC World Service and the Barbican Arts Centre, publishes this week a...

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Biographer Claire Tomalin on Charles Dickens

jasper Rees

The tally of Charles Dickens’s biographers grows ever closer to 100. The English language’s most celebrated novelist repays repeated study, of course, because both his life and his work are so...

Read more...

'Books have been my life': Doris Lessing

jasper Rees

Doris Lessing’s storm-tossed life would make a stirring biopic. She spent her early years on an isolated farm in the Southern Rhodesian veldt, abandoned the children of her first marriage to take...

Read more...

10 Questions for Count Arthur Strong

jasper Rees

Autumn is a season of tumbling leaves, dark afternoons and of course fatuous memoirs from people off the telly. But every so often the world is taken by surprise, less by autumn itself than by the...

Read more...

Extract: George Harrison - Behind the Locked Door

graeme Thomson

Following the completion of the White Album, and the conclusion of recording sessions in Los Angeles with new Apple signing Jackie Lomax, in late November 1968 George Harrison and his...

Read more...

theartsdesk Q&A: Sex researcher Shere Hite

jasper Rees

This week Channel 4 embarks on a season of programmes about sex. Real sex, it claims, in real British bedrooms. A new series called Masters of Sex dramatises the story of William Masters...

Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to theartsdesk.com

Thank you for continuing to read our work on theartsdesk.com. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.95 per month or £30 per year. We feel it's a very good deal, and hope you do too.

To take an annual subscription now simply click here.

And if you're looking for that extra gift for a friend or family member, why not treat them to a theartsdesk.com gift subscription?

latest in today

Explore Ensemble, EXAUDI, St John's Smith Square review...

This was an evening of silence and shadow, a chill, moonlit meditation, where each sound  demanded forensic attention. Enter the world of...

CD: Femi Kuti - One People One World

A superstar in the Developing World and particularly West Africa, Femi Kuti still lives somewhat unfairly in his dad, Fela Kuti’s shadow in the...

Hold the Sunset, BBC One, review - this is an ex-sitcom

You need to be of a certain vintage to have any memory of the traditional suburban family...

Flight, Scottish Opera review - poignant and powerful, this...

Inspired by the astonishing true story of Mehran Karimi Nasseri, the Iranian refugee who lived in Charles de Gaulle Airport for 18 years...

CD: Snowpoet - Thought You Knew

While some albums cram in more fillers than a Christmas stocking, Thought You Knew, the second recording from the London-based group led...

Troy: Fall of a City, BBC One review - soapification of the...

The plan to bring drama back to Saturday nights on BBC One enjoyed mixed success with Hard Sun, but now threatens to slide over a cliff...

Mick Herron: London Rules review - hypnotically fascinating,...

London Rules – explicitly cover your arse – is the fifth in the most remarkable and mesmerising series of...

Reissue CDs Weekly: The Choir

During the British Invasion years, a Cleveland, Ohio band called The Choir ploughed a Brit-focussed furrow from late...

CD: Jonny Nash and Lindsay Todd - Fauna Mapping

A little over two years ago, The Arts Desk reviewed Hipnotik Tradisi, Black Merlin’s extraordinary first offering for Island of the Gods...

Kaufmann, Damrau, Deutsch, Barbican review - bliss, if only...

Schubert’s winter wanderer had Wilhelm Muller to voice his despair, while...

newsletter

Get a weekly digest of our critical highlights in your inbox each Thursday!

Simply enter your email address in the box below

View previous newsletters